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Title: High-pressure polymorphism of two high-strength ceramics: Boron carbide (B4C) and silicon carbide (SiC)

Abstract

We have determined the lattice-level structure of two high-strength, technologically important ceramic materials under shock wave compression. For decades, laboratory shock wave studies have provided crucial information on the dynamic response of many types of materials. However, previous studies were limited to continuum-level information only. By combining laser compression with pulsed X-ray diffraction we are able to obtain in situ structural information on these materials for the first time. Silicon carbide (SiC) and boron carbide (B4C) are two high-strength ceramics with many technical applications including debris shielding, armoring, and coating. We have carried out Xray diffraction measurements of the structure of SiC and B4C under shock compression to 185 and 300 GPa, respectively. Experiments were performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions beamline of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). At LCLS, shock waves are driven into the sample using a high powered laser with approximately 10 nanosecond pulse length. The sample is probed with X-rays from the LCLS free electron laser and diffraction is recorded by x-ray detectors. By varying the delay between the laser and the x-ray probe, the sample can be studied at various times relative to the shock wave entering the sample. The diffraction data havemore » been analyzed to determine the crystal structures, lattice parameters, density, and crystallographic texture as a function of pressure and loading time.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1406133
Report Number(s):
DOE-DUFFY-16242
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0016242
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; silicon carbide; boron carbide; shock compression; x-ray diffraction

Citation Formats

Duffy, Thomas. High-pressure polymorphism of two high-strength ceramics: Boron carbide (B4C) and silicon carbide (SiC). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1406133.
Duffy, Thomas. High-pressure polymorphism of two high-strength ceramics: Boron carbide (B4C) and silicon carbide (SiC). United States. doi:10.2172/1406133.
Duffy, Thomas. Tue . "High-pressure polymorphism of two high-strength ceramics: Boron carbide (B4C) and silicon carbide (SiC)". United States. doi:10.2172/1406133. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1406133.
@article{osti_1406133,
title = {High-pressure polymorphism of two high-strength ceramics: Boron carbide (B4C) and silicon carbide (SiC)},
author = {Duffy, Thomas},
abstractNote = {We have determined the lattice-level structure of two high-strength, technologically important ceramic materials under shock wave compression. For decades, laboratory shock wave studies have provided crucial information on the dynamic response of many types of materials. However, previous studies were limited to continuum-level information only. By combining laser compression with pulsed X-ray diffraction we are able to obtain in situ structural information on these materials for the first time. Silicon carbide (SiC) and boron carbide (B4C) are two high-strength ceramics with many technical applications including debris shielding, armoring, and coating. We have carried out Xray diffraction measurements of the structure of SiC and B4C under shock compression to 185 and 300 GPa, respectively. Experiments were performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions beamline of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). At LCLS, shock waves are driven into the sample using a high powered laser with approximately 10 nanosecond pulse length. The sample is probed with X-rays from the LCLS free electron laser and diffraction is recorded by x-ray detectors. By varying the delay between the laser and the x-ray probe, the sample can be studied at various times relative to the shock wave entering the sample. The diffraction data have been analyzed to determine the crystal structures, lattice parameters, density, and crystallographic texture as a function of pressure and loading time.},
doi = {10.2172/1406133},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}