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Title: Supplemental Information for New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements

Abstract

This document is intended to aid in the understanding and application of the New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements (SIR) and Application Process for New Distributed Generators 5 MW or Less Connected in Parallel with Utility Distribution Systems, and it aims to provide supplemental information and discussion on selected topics relevant to the SIR. This guide focuses on technical issues that have to date resulted in the majority of utility findings within the context of interconnecting photovoltaic (PV) inverters. This guide provides background on the overall issue and related mitigation measures for selected topics, including substation backfeeding, anti-islanding and considerations for monitoring and controlling distributed energy resources (DER).

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1405920
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5D00-70183
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; New York; New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements; SIR; interconnection; NYSERDA; distributed energy resources; DER

Citation Formats

Ingram, Michael, Narang, David J., Mather, Barry A., and Kroposki, Benjamin D. Supplemental Information for New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1405920.
Ingram, Michael, Narang, David J., Mather, Barry A., & Kroposki, Benjamin D. Supplemental Information for New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements. United States. doi:10.2172/1405920.
Ingram, Michael, Narang, David J., Mather, Barry A., and Kroposki, Benjamin D. 2017. "Supplemental Information for New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements". United States. doi:10.2172/1405920. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1405920.
@article{osti_1405920,
title = {Supplemental Information for New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements},
author = {Ingram, Michael and Narang, David J. and Mather, Barry A. and Kroposki, Benjamin D.},
abstractNote = {This document is intended to aid in the understanding and application of the New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements (SIR) and Application Process for New Distributed Generators 5 MW or Less Connected in Parallel with Utility Distribution Systems, and it aims to provide supplemental information and discussion on selected topics relevant to the SIR. This guide focuses on technical issues that have to date resulted in the majority of utility findings within the context of interconnecting photovoltaic (PV) inverters. This guide provides background on the overall issue and related mitigation measures for selected topics, including substation backfeeding, anti-islanding and considerations for monitoring and controlling distributed energy resources (DER).},
doi = {10.2172/1405920},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

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