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Title: Uniformity of Peptide Release Is Maintained by Methylation of Release Factors

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1405523
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Cell Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-28 11:43:41; Journal ID: ISSN 2211-1247
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Pierson, William E., Hoffer, Eric D., Keedy, Hannah E., Simms, Carrie L., Dunham, Christine M., and Zaher, Hani S. Uniformity of Peptide Release Is Maintained by Methylation of Release Factors. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.085.
Pierson, William E., Hoffer, Eric D., Keedy, Hannah E., Simms, Carrie L., Dunham, Christine M., & Zaher, Hani S. Uniformity of Peptide Release Is Maintained by Methylation of Release Factors. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.085.
Pierson, William E., Hoffer, Eric D., Keedy, Hannah E., Simms, Carrie L., Dunham, Christine M., and Zaher, Hani S. 2016. "Uniformity of Peptide Release Is Maintained by Methylation of Release Factors". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.085.
@article{osti_1405523,
title = {Uniformity of Peptide Release Is Maintained by Methylation of Release Factors},
author = {Pierson, William E. and Hoffer, Eric D. and Keedy, Hannah E. and Simms, Carrie L. and Dunham, Christine M. and Zaher, Hani S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.085},
journal = {Cell Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 17,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.085

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  • DNA methylation within GC-rich promoters of constitutively expressed X-linked genes is correlated with transcriptional silencing on the inactive X chromosome in female mammals. For most X-linked genes, X chromosome inactivation results in transcriptionally active and inactive alleles occupying each female nucleus. To examine mechanisms responsible for maintaining this unique system of differential gene expression, we have analyzed the methylation of individual cytosine residues in the 5{prime} CpG island of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the active and inactive X chromosomes. These studies demonstrate the 5{prime} CpG islands of active and 5-azacytidine-reactivated alleles are essentially unmethylated while the inactivemore » allele is hypermethylated. The inactive allele is completely methylated at nearly all CpG dinucleotides except in a 68-bp region containing four adjacent GC boxes where most CpG dinucleotides are either unmethylated or partially methylated. Curiously, these GC boxes exhibit in vivo footprints only on the active X chromosome, not on the inactive X. The methylation pattern of the inactive HPRT gene is strikingly different from that reported for the inactive X-linked human phosphoglycerate kinase gene which exhibits methylation at all CpG sites in the 5{prime} CpG island. These results suggest that the position of methylated CpG dinucleotides, the density of methylated CpGs, the length of methylated regions, and/or chromatin structure associated with methylated DNA may have a role in repressing the activity of housekeeping promoters on the inactive X chromosome. The pattern of DNA methylation on the inactive human HPRT gene may also provide insight into the process of inactivating the gene early in female embryogenesis. 55 refs., 7 figs.« less