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Title: Terms, Trends, and Insights: PV Project Finance in the United States, 2017

Abstract

This brief is a compilation of data points and market insights that reflect the state of the project finance market for solar photovoltaic (PV) assets in the United States as of the third quarter of 2017. This information can generally be used as a simplified benchmark of the costs associated with securing financing for solar PV as well as the cost of the financing itself (i.e., the cost of capital). This work represents the second DOE sponsored effort to benchmark financing costs across the residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV markets, as part of its larger effort to benchmark the components of PV system costs.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1405278
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A20-70157
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; solar; photovoltaic; PV; project finance; finance; tax equity; sponsor equity; cost of capital; internal rate of return; IRR; debt; transaction costs

Citation Formats

Feldman, David J, and Schwabe, Paul D. Terms, Trends, and Insights: PV Project Finance in the United States, 2017. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Feldman, David J, & Schwabe, Paul D. Terms, Trends, and Insights: PV Project Finance in the United States, 2017. United States.
Feldman, David J, and Schwabe, Paul D. 2017. "Terms, Trends, and Insights: PV Project Finance in the United States, 2017". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1405278.
@article{osti_1405278,
title = {Terms, Trends, and Insights: PV Project Finance in the United States, 2017},
author = {Feldman, David J and Schwabe, Paul D},
abstractNote = {This brief is a compilation of data points and market insights that reflect the state of the project finance market for solar photovoltaic (PV) assets in the United States as of the third quarter of 2017. This information can generally be used as a simplified benchmark of the costs associated with securing financing for solar PV as well as the cost of the financing itself (i.e., the cost of capital). This work represents the second DOE sponsored effort to benchmark financing costs across the residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV markets, as part of its larger effort to benchmark the components of PV system costs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}
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