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Title: Genetic Tool Development for the green algae Nannochloropsis.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1405255
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-10638C
648502
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Algal Biomass Summit held October 23-26, 2016 in Phoenix, AZ.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

McEwen, Jordan T, Ruffing, Anne, Lane, Todd, and Lane, Pamela. Genetic Tool Development for the green algae Nannochloropsis.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
McEwen, Jordan T, Ruffing, Anne, Lane, Todd, & Lane, Pamela. Genetic Tool Development for the green algae Nannochloropsis.. United States.
McEwen, Jordan T, Ruffing, Anne, Lane, Todd, and Lane, Pamela. 2016. "Genetic Tool Development for the green algae Nannochloropsis.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1405255.
@article{osti_1405255,
title = {Genetic Tool Development for the green algae Nannochloropsis.},
author = {McEwen, Jordan T and Ruffing, Anne and Lane, Todd and Lane, Pamela},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Abstract not provided.
  • This project has resulted in the increase in our understanding of how proteins interact with and influence the properties of bound cofactors. This information is important for several reasons, including providing essential information for the re-engineering of biological molecules, such as proteins, for either improved function or entirely new ones. In particular, we have found that a molecule, such as the phylloquinone used in Photosystem I (PS1), can be made a stronger electron donor by placing it in a hydrophobic (greasy) environment surrounded by negative charges. In addition, the protein is constrained in its interactions with the phylloqinone, in thatmore » it must bind the cofactor tightly, but not in such a way that would stabilize the reduced (natively-charged) version of the molecule. We have used a combination of molecular genetics, in order to make specific mutations in the region of the phylloquinone, and an advanced form of spectroscopy capable of monitoring the transfer of electrons within PS1 using living cells as the material. This approach turned out to produce a significant savings in time and supplies, as it allowed us to focus quickly on the mutants that produced interesting effects, without having to go through laborious purification of the affected proteins. We followed up selected mutants using other spectroscopic techniques in order to gain more specialized information.« less
  • This project has resulted in the increase in our understanding of how proteins interact with and influence the properties of bound cofactors. This information is important for several reasons, including providing essential information for the re-engineering of biological molecules, such as proteins, for either improved function or entirely new ones. In particular, we have found that a molecule, such as the phylloquinone used in Photosystem I (PS1), can be made a stronger electron donor by placing it in a hydrophobic environment surrounded by negative charges. In addition, the protein is constrained in its interactions with the phylloqinone, in that itmore » must bind the cofactor tightly, but not in such a way that would stabilize the reduced (negatively-charged) version of the molecule. We have used a combination of molecular genetics, in order to make specific mutations in the region of the phylloquinone, and an advanced form of spectroscopy capable of monitoring the transfer of electrons within PS1 using living cells as the material. This approach turned out to produce a significant savings in time and supplies, as it allowed us to focus quickly on the mutants that produced interesting effects, without having to go through laborious purification of the affected proteins. We followed up selected mutants using other spectroscopic techniques in order to gain more specialized information. In addition to the main project funded by this work, this grant supported several related side-projects that also increased our understanding about related issues.« less
  • The principal objective of this project was to identify genes necessary for biophotolytic hydrogen production in green algae, using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an experimental organism. The main strategy was to isolate mutants that are selectively deficient in hydrogen production and to genetically map, physically isolate, and ultimately sequence the affected genes.