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Title: Underground pumped storage hydropower plants using open pit mines: How do groundwater exchanges influence the efficiency?

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1405195
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Applied Energy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 190; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-27 03:59:03; Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Pujades, Estanislao, Orban, Philippe, Bodeux, Sarah, Archambeau, Pierre, Erpicum, Sébastien, and Dassargues, Alain. Underground pumped storage hydropower plants using open pit mines: How do groundwater exchanges influence the efficiency?. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.12.093.
Pujades, Estanislao, Orban, Philippe, Bodeux, Sarah, Archambeau, Pierre, Erpicum, Sébastien, & Dassargues, Alain. Underground pumped storage hydropower plants using open pit mines: How do groundwater exchanges influence the efficiency?. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.12.093.
Pujades, Estanislao, Orban, Philippe, Bodeux, Sarah, Archambeau, Pierre, Erpicum, Sébastien, and Dassargues, Alain. Wed . "Underground pumped storage hydropower plants using open pit mines: How do groundwater exchanges influence the efficiency?". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.12.093.
@article{osti_1405195,
title = {Underground pumped storage hydropower plants using open pit mines: How do groundwater exchanges influence the efficiency?},
author = {Pujades, Estanislao and Orban, Philippe and Bodeux, Sarah and Archambeau, Pierre and Erpicum, Sébastien and Dassargues, Alain},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.12.093},
journal = {Applied Energy},
number = C,
volume = 190,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.12.093

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
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