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Title: Operational Experience with the Frontier System in CMS

Abstract

The Frontier framework is used in the CMS experiment at the LHC to deliver conditions data to processing clients worldwide, including calibration, alignment, and configuration information. Each central server at CERN, called a Frontier Launchpad, uses tomcat as a servlet container to establish the communication between clients and the central Oracle database. HTTP-proxy Squid servers, located close to clients, cache the responses to queries in order to provide high performance data access and to reduce the load on the central Oracle database. Each Frontier Launchpad also has its own reverse-proxy Squid for caching. The three central servers have been delivering about 5 million responses every day since the LHC startup, containing about 40 GB data in total, to more than one hundred Squid servers located worldwide, with an average response time on the order of 10 milliseconds. The Squid caches deployed worldwide process many more requests per day, over 700 million, and deliver over 40 TB of data. Several monitoring tools of the tomcat log files, the accesses of the Squids on the central Launchpad servers, and the availability of remote Squids have been developed to guarantee the performance of the service and make the system easily maintainable. Following amore » brief introduction of the Frontier framework, we describe the performance of this highly reliable and stable system, detail monitoring concerns and their deployment, and discuss the overall operational experience from the first two years of LHC data-taking.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3]
  1. Johns Hopkins U.
  2. Fermilab
  3. CERN
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
Contributing Org.:
CMS
OSTI Identifier:
1405096
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-12-295-CD
1215011
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
J.Phys.Conf.Ser.
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 396; Conference: 19th International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics, New York, USA, 05/21-05/25/2012
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Blumenfeld, Barry, Dykstra, Dave, Kreuzer, Peter, Du, Ran, and Wang, Weizhen. Operational Experience with the Frontier System in CMS. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/396/5/052014.
Blumenfeld, Barry, Dykstra, Dave, Kreuzer, Peter, Du, Ran, & Wang, Weizhen. Operational Experience with the Frontier System in CMS. United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/396/5/052014.
Blumenfeld, Barry, Dykstra, Dave, Kreuzer, Peter, Du, Ran, and Wang, Weizhen. Wed . "Operational Experience with the Frontier System in CMS". United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/396/5/052014. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1405096.
@article{osti_1405096,
title = {Operational Experience with the Frontier System in CMS},
author = {Blumenfeld, Barry and Dykstra, Dave and Kreuzer, Peter and Du, Ran and Wang, Weizhen},
abstractNote = {The Frontier framework is used in the CMS experiment at the LHC to deliver conditions data to processing clients worldwide, including calibration, alignment, and configuration information. Each central server at CERN, called a Frontier Launchpad, uses tomcat as a servlet container to establish the communication between clients and the central Oracle database. HTTP-proxy Squid servers, located close to clients, cache the responses to queries in order to provide high performance data access and to reduce the load on the central Oracle database. Each Frontier Launchpad also has its own reverse-proxy Squid for caching. The three central servers have been delivering about 5 million responses every day since the LHC startup, containing about 40 GB data in total, to more than one hundred Squid servers located worldwide, with an average response time on the order of 10 milliseconds. The Squid caches deployed worldwide process many more requests per day, over 700 million, and deliver over 40 TB of data. Several monitoring tools of the tomcat log files, the accesses of the Squids on the central Launchpad servers, and the availability of remote Squids have been developed to guarantee the performance of the service and make the system easily maintainable. Following a brief introduction of the Frontier framework, we describe the performance of this highly reliable and stable system, detail monitoring concerns and their deployment, and discuss the overall operational experience from the first two years of LHC data-taking.},
doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/396/5/052014},
journal = {J.Phys.Conf.Ser.},
number = ,
volume = 396,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {6}
}

Conference:
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