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Title: Adopting Energy Efficiency in Connected Homes

Abstract

This presentation on connected homes was presented at the 11th Rocky Mountain Utility Efficiency Exchange on September 28, 2017. The discussion covered the integration of energy efficiency measures and practices with Internet of Things (IoT) awareness and adoption of smart technologies and services via WiFi/ Bluetooth enabled home and office equipment. The presentation also describes the benefits to the home and business and benefits/challenges for the utility/implementer.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. CLEAResult
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1405068
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5500-70267
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at 11th Rocky Mountain Utility Efficiency Exchange, 27-29 September 2017, Aspen, Colorado
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; RMUEE; Rocky Mountain Utility Efficience Exchange; Internet of Things; connected homes; benefits; challenges; energy integration

Citation Formats

Christensen, Dane T, and Kemper, Emily. Adopting Energy Efficiency in Connected Homes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Christensen, Dane T, & Kemper, Emily. Adopting Energy Efficiency in Connected Homes. United States.
Christensen, Dane T, and Kemper, Emily. 2017. "Adopting Energy Efficiency in Connected Homes". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1405068.
@article{osti_1405068,
title = {Adopting Energy Efficiency in Connected Homes},
author = {Christensen, Dane T and Kemper, Emily},
abstractNote = {This presentation on connected homes was presented at the 11th Rocky Mountain Utility Efficiency Exchange on September 28, 2017. The discussion covered the integration of energy efficiency measures and practices with Internet of Things (IoT) awareness and adoption of smart technologies and services via WiFi/ Bluetooth enabled home and office equipment. The presentation also describes the benefits to the home and business and benefits/challenges for the utility/implementer.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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