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Title: Spectrum and Degree of CDK Drug Interactions Predicts Clinical Performance

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
INDUSTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1405014
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Molecular Cancer Therapeutics; Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Chen, P., Lee, N. V., Hu, W., Xu, M., Ferre, R. A., Lam, H., Bergqvist, S., Solowiej, J., Diehl, W., He, Y. -A., Yu, X., Nagata, A., VanArsdale, T., and Murray, B. W. Spectrum and Degree of CDK Drug Interactions Predicts Clinical Performance. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-16-0300.
Chen, P., Lee, N. V., Hu, W., Xu, M., Ferre, R. A., Lam, H., Bergqvist, S., Solowiej, J., Diehl, W., He, Y. -A., Yu, X., Nagata, A., VanArsdale, T., & Murray, B. W. Spectrum and Degree of CDK Drug Interactions Predicts Clinical Performance. United States. doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-16-0300.
Chen, P., Lee, N. V., Hu, W., Xu, M., Ferre, R. A., Lam, H., Bergqvist, S., Solowiej, J., Diehl, W., He, Y. -A., Yu, X., Nagata, A., VanArsdale, T., and Murray, B. W. Fri . "Spectrum and Degree of CDK Drug Interactions Predicts Clinical Performance". United States. doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-16-0300.
@article{osti_1405014,
title = {Spectrum and Degree of CDK Drug Interactions Predicts Clinical Performance},
author = {Chen, P. and Lee, N. V. and Hu, W. and Xu, M. and Ferre, R. A. and Lam, H. and Bergqvist, S. and Solowiej, J. and Diehl, W. and He, Y. -A. and Yu, X. and Nagata, A. and VanArsdale, T. and Murray, B. W.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-16-0300},
journal = {Molecular Cancer Therapeutics},
number = 10,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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