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Title: Precision Cleaning and Protection of Coated Optical Components for NIF Small Optics

Abstract

The purpose of this procedure shall be to define the precision cleaning of finished, coated, small optical components for NIF at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. The term “small optical components” includes coated optics that are set into simple mounts, as well as coated, un-mounted optics.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1404859
Report Number(s):
LLNL-SR-740261
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Phelps, Jim. Precision Cleaning and Protection of Coated Optical Components for NIF Small Optics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1404859.
Phelps, Jim. Precision Cleaning and Protection of Coated Optical Components for NIF Small Optics. United States. doi:10.2172/1404859.
Phelps, Jim. 2017. "Precision Cleaning and Protection of Coated Optical Components for NIF Small Optics". United States. doi:10.2172/1404859. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1404859.
@article{osti_1404859,
title = {Precision Cleaning and Protection of Coated Optical Components for NIF Small Optics},
author = {Phelps, Jim},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this procedure shall be to define the precision cleaning of finished, coated, small optical components for NIF at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. The term “small optical components” includes coated optics that are set into simple mounts, as well as coated, un-mounted optics.},
doi = {10.2172/1404859},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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