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Title: Zero Waste Journey at SNL/NM.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1404803
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-10511PE
648408
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the EFCOG Sustainability and Environment Sub Group at SNL/CA held October 18-20, 2016 in Livermore, CA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wrons, Ralph J. Zero Waste Journey at SNL/NM.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Wrons, Ralph J. Zero Waste Journey at SNL/NM.. United States.
Wrons, Ralph J. 2016. "Zero Waste Journey at SNL/NM.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1404803.
@article{osti_1404803,
title = {Zero Waste Journey at SNL/NM.},
author = {Wrons, Ralph J.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Conference:
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