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Title: Aerial Radiation Detection

Abstract

An airborne system designed for the detection of radioactive sources on the soil surface from an aircraft normally senses gamma rays emitted by the source. Gamma rays have the longest path length (least attenuation) through the air of any of the common radioactive emissions and will thus permit source detection at large distances. A secondary benefit from gamma rays detection if that nearly all radioactive isotopes can be identified by the spectrum of gammas emitted. Major gaseous emissions from fuel processing plants emit gammas that may be detected and identified. Some types of special nuclear material also emit neutrons which are also useful for detection at a distance.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Bechtel Nevada Corporation (US); Special Technologies Lab, Santa Barbara, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
14046
Report Number(s):
DOE/NV/11718-242
TRN: US0110955
DOE Contract Number:  
AC08-96NV11718
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 30 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; AIRCRAFT; ATTENUATION; NEUTRON DETECTION; SOILS; GAMMA DETECTION; AERIAL SURVEYING; FUEL REPROCESSING PLANTS; RADIATION DETECTORS; DESIGN

Citation Formats

W. M. Quam. Aerial Radiation Detection. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/14046.
W. M. Quam. Aerial Radiation Detection. United States. doi:10.2172/14046.
W. M. Quam. Thu . "Aerial Radiation Detection". United States. doi:10.2172/14046. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/14046.
@article{osti_14046,
title = {Aerial Radiation Detection},
author = {W. M. Quam},
abstractNote = {An airborne system designed for the detection of radioactive sources on the soil surface from an aircraft normally senses gamma rays emitted by the source. Gamma rays have the longest path length (least attenuation) through the air of any of the common radioactive emissions and will thus permit source detection at large distances. A secondary benefit from gamma rays detection if that nearly all radioactive isotopes can be identified by the spectrum of gammas emitted. Major gaseous emissions from fuel processing plants emit gammas that may be detected and identified. Some types of special nuclear material also emit neutrons which are also useful for detection at a distance.},
doi = {10.2172/14046},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Thu Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}

Technical Report:

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