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Title: Regional water coefficients for U.S. industrial sectors

Abstract

Designing policies for water systems management requires the capability to assess the economic impacts of water availability and to effectively couple water withdrawals by human activities with natural hydrologic dynamics. At the core of any scientific approach to these issues there is the estimation of water withdrawals by industrial sectors in the form of water coefficients, which are measurements of the quantity of water withdrawn per dollar of GDP or output. Here, we focus on the contiguous United States and on the estimation of water coefficients for regional scale analyses. We first compare an established methodology for the estimation of national water coefficients with a parametric one we propose. Second, we introduce a method to estimate water coefficients at the level of ecological regions and we discuss how they reduce possible biases in regional analyses of water systems. Finally, we discuss advantages and limits of regional water coefficients.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1402587
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-15-24628
Journal ID: ISSN 2212-3717
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Water Resources and Industry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 2212-3717
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Industrial water withdrawals and uses; Regional water systems; Natural water cycle alterations; Parametric methods

Citation Formats

Boero, Riccardo, and Pasqualini, Donatella. Regional water coefficients for U.S. industrial sectors. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.wri.2017.09.001.
Boero, Riccardo, & Pasqualini, Donatella. Regional water coefficients for U.S. industrial sectors. United States. doi:10.1016/j.wri.2017.09.001.
Boero, Riccardo, and Pasqualini, Donatella. 2017. "Regional water coefficients for U.S. industrial sectors". United States. doi:10.1016/j.wri.2017.09.001. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1402587.
@article{osti_1402587,
title = {Regional water coefficients for U.S. industrial sectors},
author = {Boero, Riccardo and Pasqualini, Donatella},
abstractNote = {Designing policies for water systems management requires the capability to assess the economic impacts of water availability and to effectively couple water withdrawals by human activities with natural hydrologic dynamics. At the core of any scientific approach to these issues there is the estimation of water withdrawals by industrial sectors in the form of water coefficients, which are measurements of the quantity of water withdrawn per dollar of GDP or output. Here, we focus on the contiguous United States and on the estimation of water coefficients for regional scale analyses. We first compare an established methodology for the estimation of national water coefficients with a parametric one we propose. Second, we introduce a method to estimate water coefficients at the level of ecological regions and we discuss how they reduce possible biases in regional analyses of water systems. Finally, we discuss advantages and limits of regional water coefficients.},
doi = {10.1016/j.wri.2017.09.001},
journal = {Water Resources and Industry},
number = C,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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