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Title: Broadening of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions and Warm Rain Initiation Associated with Turbulence: An Overview

Abstract

In the paper of warm clouds, there are many outstanding questions. Cloud droplet size distributions are much wider, and warm rain is initiated in a shorter time and with a shallower cloud depth than theoretical expectations. This review summarizes the studies related to the effects of turbulent fluctuations and turbulent entrainment-mixing on the broadening of droplet size distributions and warm rain initiation, including observational, laboratorial, numerical, and theoretical achievements. Particular attention is paid to studies by Chinese scientists since the 1950s, since most results have been published in Chinese. The review reveals that high-resolution observations and simulations, and laboratory experiments are needed because knowledge of the detailed physical processes involved in the effects of turbulence and entrainment-mixing on cloud microphysics still remains elusive.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Nanjing Univ. of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing (China); Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  3. Nanjing Univ. of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1402421
Report Number(s):
BNL-114424-2017-JA
R&D Project: 2019‐BNL-EE630EECA-Budg; SICI 0035-9009(20050101)131:605L.195;1-
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmos. Oceanic Sci. Lettrs
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmos. Oceanic Sci. Lettrs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; cloud droplet size distribution; warm rain; turbulent fluctuations; entrainment-mixing; systems theory

Citation Formats

Lu, Chunsong, Liu, Yangang, Niu, Shengjie, and Xue, Yuqi. Broadening of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions and Warm Rain Initiation Associated with Turbulence: An Overview. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1256/qj.03.199.
Lu, Chunsong, Liu, Yangang, Niu, Shengjie, & Xue, Yuqi. Broadening of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions and Warm Rain Initiation Associated with Turbulence: An Overview. United States. doi:10.1256/qj.03.199.
Lu, Chunsong, Liu, Yangang, Niu, Shengjie, and Xue, Yuqi. 2017. "Broadening of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions and Warm Rain Initiation Associated with Turbulence: An Overview". United States. doi:10.1256/qj.03.199.
@article{osti_1402421,
title = {Broadening of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions and Warm Rain Initiation Associated with Turbulence: An Overview},
author = {Lu, Chunsong and Liu, Yangang and Niu, Shengjie and Xue, Yuqi},
abstractNote = {In the paper of warm clouds, there are many outstanding questions. Cloud droplet size distributions are much wider, and warm rain is initiated in a shorter time and with a shallower cloud depth than theoretical expectations. This review summarizes the studies related to the effects of turbulent fluctuations and turbulent entrainment-mixing on the broadening of droplet size distributions and warm rain initiation, including observational, laboratorial, numerical, and theoretical achievements. Particular attention is paid to studies by Chinese scientists since the 1950s, since most results have been published in Chinese. The review reveals that high-resolution observations and simulations, and laboratory experiments are needed because knowledge of the detailed physical processes involved in the effects of turbulence and entrainment-mixing on cloud microphysics still remains elusive.},
doi = {10.1256/qj.03.199},
journal = {Atmos. Oceanic Sci. Lettrs},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on October 12, 2018
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