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Title: What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers

Abstract

Many fleet managers have opted to incorporate alternative fuels and advanced vehicles into their lineup. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) offer a variety of choices, and there are additional options offered by aftermarket companies. There are also a myriad of ways that existing vehicles can be modified to utilize alternative fuels and other advanced technologies. Vehicle conversions and retrofit packages, along with engine repower options, can offer an ideal way to lower vehicle operating costs. This can result in long term return on investment, in addition to helping fleet managers achieve emissions and environmental goals. This report summarizes the various factors to consider when pursuing a conversion, retrofit, or repower option.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1402411
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5400-69030; DOE/GO-102017-5039
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; Clean Cities; lessons learned; alternative fuels and vehicles; repower; conversion; retrofit

Citation Formats

Kelly, Kay L., and Gonzales, John. What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1402411.
Kelly, Kay L., & Gonzales, John. What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers. United States. doi:10.2172/1402411.
Kelly, Kay L., and Gonzales, John. 2017. "What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers". United States. doi:10.2172/1402411. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1402411.
@article{osti_1402411,
title = {What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers},
author = {Kelly, Kay L. and Gonzales, John},
abstractNote = {Many fleet managers have opted to incorporate alternative fuels and advanced vehicles into their lineup. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) offer a variety of choices, and there are additional options offered by aftermarket companies. There are also a myriad of ways that existing vehicles can be modified to utilize alternative fuels and other advanced technologies. Vehicle conversions and retrofit packages, along with engine repower options, can offer an ideal way to lower vehicle operating costs. This can result in long term return on investment, in addition to helping fleet managers achieve emissions and environmental goals. This report summarizes the various factors to consider when pursuing a conversion, retrofit, or repower option.},
doi = {10.2172/1402411},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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