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Title: Increased water yield due to the hemlock woolly adelgid infestation in New England: Increased Water Yield by HWA Infestation

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. Department of Geography, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington Indiana USA, Department of Earth and Environment, Boston University, Boston Massachusetts USA
  2. Department of Geography, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington Indiana USA
  3. School for the Environment, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston Massachusetts USA
  4. Harvard Forest, Harvard University, Petersham Massachusetts USA
  5. School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1402332
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-23 17:30:52; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kim, Jihyun, Hwang, Taehee, Schaaf, Crystal L., Orwig, David A., Boose, Emery, and Munger, J. William. Increased water yield due to the hemlock woolly adelgid infestation in New England: Increased Water Yield by HWA Infestation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016GL072327.
Kim, Jihyun, Hwang, Taehee, Schaaf, Crystal L., Orwig, David A., Boose, Emery, & Munger, J. William. Increased water yield due to the hemlock woolly adelgid infestation in New England: Increased Water Yield by HWA Infestation. United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL072327.
Kim, Jihyun, Hwang, Taehee, Schaaf, Crystal L., Orwig, David A., Boose, Emery, and Munger, J. William. Wed . "Increased water yield due to the hemlock woolly adelgid infestation in New England: Increased Water Yield by HWA Infestation". United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL072327.
@article{osti_1402332,
title = {Increased water yield due to the hemlock woolly adelgid infestation in New England: Increased Water Yield by HWA Infestation},
author = {Kim, Jihyun and Hwang, Taehee and Schaaf, Crystal L. and Orwig, David A. and Boose, Emery and Munger, J. William},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2016GL072327},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/2016GL072327

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