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Title: Global variation of transpiration and soil evaporation and the role of their major climate drivers: Global Variation in Evapotranspiration Components

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. CSIRO Land and Water, Canberra ACT Australia
  2. Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China
  3. State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu China
  4. Deceased, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Canberra ACT Australia
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1402247
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: 13; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-04-03 10:57:02; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-897X
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zhang, Yongqiang, Chiew, Francis H. S., Peña-Arancibia, Jorge, Sun, Fubao, Li, Hongxia, and Leuning, Ray. Global variation of transpiration and soil evaporation and the role of their major climate drivers: Global Variation in Evapotranspiration Components. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2017JD027025.
Zhang, Yongqiang, Chiew, Francis H. S., Peña-Arancibia, Jorge, Sun, Fubao, Li, Hongxia, & Leuning, Ray. Global variation of transpiration and soil evaporation and the role of their major climate drivers: Global Variation in Evapotranspiration Components. United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD027025.
Zhang, Yongqiang, Chiew, Francis H. S., Peña-Arancibia, Jorge, Sun, Fubao, Li, Hongxia, and Leuning, Ray. Sat . "Global variation of transpiration and soil evaporation and the role of their major climate drivers: Global Variation in Evapotranspiration Components". United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD027025.
@article{osti_1402247,
title = {Global variation of transpiration and soil evaporation and the role of their major climate drivers: Global Variation in Evapotranspiration Components},
author = {Zhang, Yongqiang and Chiew, Francis H. S. and Peña-Arancibia, Jorge and Sun, Fubao and Li, Hongxia and Leuning, Ray},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2017JD027025},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},
number = 13,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 8, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Cited by 5
  • Ecosystem functioning relies heavily on below-ground processes, which are largely regulated by plant fine-roots and their functional traits. However, our knowledge of fine-root trait distribution relies to date on local- and regional-scale studies with limited numbers of species, growth forms and environmental variation. We compiled a world-wide fine-root trait dataset, featuring 1115 species from contrasting climatic areas, phylogeny and growth forms to test a series of hypotheses pertaining to the influence of plant functional types, soil and climate variables, and the degree of manipulation of plant growing conditions on species fine-root trait variation. Most particularly, we tested the competing hypothesesmore » that fine-root traits typical of faster return on investment would be most strongly associated with conditions of limiting versus favourable soil resource availability. We accounted for both data source and species phylogenetic relatedness. We demonstrate that: (i) Climate conditions promoting soil fertility relate negatively to fine-root traits favouring fast soil resource acquisition, with a particularly strong positive effect of temperature on fine-root diameter and negative effect on specific root length (SRL), and a negative effect of rainfall on root nitrogen concentration; (ii) Soil bulk density strongly influences species fine-root morphology, by favouring thicker, denser fine-roots; (iii) Fine-roots from herbaceous species are on average finer and have higher SRL than those of woody species, and N 2-fixing capacity positively relates to root nitrogen; and (iv) Plants growing in pots have higher SRL than those grown in the field. Synthesis. This study reveals both the large variation in fine-root traits encountered globally and the relevance of several key plant functional types and soil and climate variables for explaining a substantial part of this variation. Climate, particularly temperature, and plant functional types were the two strongest predictors of fine-root trait variation. High trait variation occurred at local scales, suggesting that wide-ranging below-ground resource economics strategies are viable within most climatic areas and soil conditions.« less
  • Soil respiration is an important component of the global carbon cycle and is highly responsive to changes in soil temperature and moisture. Accurate prediction of soil respiration and its changes under future climatic conditions requires a clear understanding of the processes involved. In spite of this, most current empirical soil respiration models incorporate just few of the underlying mechanisms that may influence its response. In this study, a new partial process-based component model built on source components of soil respiration was tested using data collected from a multi-factor climate change experiment that manipulates CO2 concentrations, temperature and precipitation. These resultsmore » were then compared to results generated using several other established models. The component model we tested performed well across different treatments of global climate change. In contrast, some other models, which worked well predicting ambient environmental conditions, were unable to predict the changes under different climate change treatments. Based on the component model, the relative proportions of heterotrophic respiration (Rh) in the total soil respiration at different treatments varied from 0.33 to 0.85. There is a significant increase in the proportion of Rh under the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration in comparison ambient conditions. The dry treatment resulted in higher proportion of Rh at elevated CO2 and ambient T than under elevated CO2 and elevated T. Also, the ratios between root growth and root maintenance respiration varied across different treatments. Neither increased temperature nor elevated atmospheric CO2 changed Q10 values significantly, while the average Q10 value at wet sites was significantly higher than it at dry sites. There was a higher possibility of increased soil respiration under drying relative to wetting conditions across all treatments based on monthly data, indicating that soil respiration may also be related to soil moisture at previous time periods. Our results reveal that the extent, time delay and contribution of different source components need to be included into mechanistic/processes-based soil respiration models at corresponding scale.« less
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