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Title: The microphysical contributions to and evolution of latent heating profiles in two MC3E MCSs: LATENT HEATING PROFILES IN TWO MC3E MCSS

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins Colorado USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1402203
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0010569
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 121; Journal Issue: 13; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-23 17:16:10; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-897X
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Marinescu, P. J., van den Heever, S. C., Saleeby, S. M., and Kreidenweis, S. M. The microphysical contributions to and evolution of latent heating profiles in two MC3E MCSs: LATENT HEATING PROFILES IN TWO MC3E MCSS. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/2016JD024762.
Marinescu, P. J., van den Heever, S. C., Saleeby, S. M., & Kreidenweis, S. M. The microphysical contributions to and evolution of latent heating profiles in two MC3E MCSs: LATENT HEATING PROFILES IN TWO MC3E MCSS. United States. doi:10.1002/2016JD024762.
Marinescu, P. J., van den Heever, S. C., Saleeby, S. M., and Kreidenweis, S. M. Sat . "The microphysical contributions to and evolution of latent heating profiles in two MC3E MCSs: LATENT HEATING PROFILES IN TWO MC3E MCSS". United States. doi:10.1002/2016JD024762.
@article{osti_1402203,
title = {The microphysical contributions to and evolution of latent heating profiles in two MC3E MCSs: LATENT HEATING PROFILES IN TWO MC3E MCSS},
author = {Marinescu, P. J. and van den Heever, S. C. and Saleeby, S. M. and Kreidenweis, S. M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2016JD024762},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},
number = 13,
volume = 121,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 09 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Jul 09 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/2016JD024762

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 5works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • In this study, six deep convective systems (DCSs) with a total of 5589 five-second samples and a range of temperatures from -41°C to 0°C during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) were selected to investigate the ice cloud microphysical properties of DCSs over the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The ice cloud measurements of the DCS cases were made by the University of North Dakota Citation II research aircraft, and the ice cloud properties were derived through the following processes. First, the instances of supercooled liquid water in the ice-dominated cloud layersmore » of DCSs have been eliminated using multisensor detection, including the Rosemount Icing Detector, King and Cloud Droplet Probes, as well as 2DC and Cloud Imaging Probe images. Then the Nevzorov-measured ice water contents (IWCs) at maximum diameter D max < 4000 µm are used as the best estimation to determine a new mass-dimensional relationship. Finally, the newly derived mass-dimensional relationship (a = 0.00365, b = 2.1) has been applied to a full spectrum of particle size distributions (PSDs, 120–30,000 µm) constructed from both 2DC and High-Volume Precipitation Spectrometer measurements to calculate the best-estimated IWCs of DCSs during MC3E. The averages of the total number concentrations (N t), median mass diameter (D m), maximum diameter (D max), and IWC from six selected cases are 0.035 cm -3, 1666 µm, 8841 µm, and 0.45 g m -3, respectively. The gamma-type-size distributions are then generated matching the observed PSDs (120–30,000 µm), and the fitted gamma parameters are compared with the observed PSDs through multimoment assessments including first moment (D m), third moment (IWC), and sixth moment (equivalent radar reflectivity, Z e). Lastly, for application of observed PSDs to the remote sensing community, a series of empirical relationships between fitted parameters and Z e values has been derived, and the bullet rosette ice crystal backscattering relationship has been suggested for ground-based remote sensing.« less
  • A detailed microphysical model is used to simulate the formation of wintertime orographic clouds in a two-dimensional domain under steady-state conditions. Mass contents and number concentrations of both liquid- and ice-phase cloud particles are calculated to be in reasonable agreement with observations. The ice particles in the cloud, as well as those precipitated to the surface, are classified into small cloud ice, planar crystals, columnar crystals, heavily rimed crystals, and crystal aggregates. Detailed examination of the results reveals that contact nucleation and rime splintering are the major ice-production mechanisms functioning in the warmer part of the cloud, whereas deposition/condensation-freezing nucleationmore » is dominant at the upper levels. Surface precipitation, either in the form of rain or snow, develops mainly through riming and aggregation, removing over 17% of the total water vapor that entered the cloud. The spectral distributions of cloud particles in a multicomponent framework provide information not only on particle sizes but also on their solute contents and, for ice particles, their shapes. Examination of these multicomponent distributions reveals the mechanisms of particle formation and interaction, as well as the adaptation of crystal habits to the ambient conditions. Additional simulations were done to test the sensitivity of cloud and precipitation formation to the size distribution of aerosol particles. It is found that the size distribution of aerosol particles has significant influence on not only the warm-cloud processes, but also the cold-cloud processes. A reduction in aerosol particle concentration not only causes an earlier precipitation development but also an increase in the amount of total precipitation from the orographic clouds.« less
  • Advancing understanding of deep convection microphysics via mesoscale modeling studies of well-observed case studies requires observation-based aerosol inputs. Here, we derive hygroscopic aerosol size distribution input profiles from ground-based and airborne measurements for six convection case studies observed during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) over Oklahoma. We demonstrate use of an input profile in simulations of the only well-observed case study that produced extensive stratiform outflow on 20 May 2011. At well-sampled elevations between –11 and –23 °C over widespread stratiform rain, ice crystal number concentrations are consistently dominated by a single mode near ~400 µm in randomly oriented maximummore » dimension ( D max). The ice mass at –23 °C is primarily in a closely collocated mode, whereas a mass mode near D max ~1000 µm becomes dominant with decreasing elevation to the –11 °C level, consistent with possible aggregation during sedimentation. However, simulations with and without observation-based aerosol inputs systematically overpredict mass peak D max by a factor of 3–5 and underpredict ice number concentration by a factor of 4–10. Previously reported simulations with both two-moment and size-resolved microphysics have shown biases of a similar nature. Furthermore, the observed ice properties are notably similar to those reported from recent tropical measurements. Based on several lines of evidence, we speculate that updraft microphysical pathways determining outflow properties in the 20 May case are similar to a tropical regime, likely associated with warm-temperature ice multiplication that is not well understood or well represented in models.« less
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  • Results of the model estimates of the variability of opto-microphysical characteristics of the stratospheric aerosol in the process of eddy mixing and gravitational sedimentation of an eruptive cloud are discussed. The possible fine spectral structure in backscattering coefficient and lidar ratio variations are analyzed. Estimates show that spectral values of lidar ratio in the interval 30-40 nm about the wavelength [lambda] = 1.06 can change by 200-400% when the process of monodispersity of the coarse fraction culminates. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.