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Title: Modeling the climate impacts of deploying solar reflective cool pavements in California cities: Climate Impact of Adopting Cool Pavement

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles California USA
  2. Heat Island Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1402150
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: 13; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-23 16:48:31; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-897X
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Mohegh, Arash, Rosado, Pablo, Jin, Ling, Millstein, Dev, Levinson, Ronnen, and Ban-Weiss, George. Modeling the climate impacts of deploying solar reflective cool pavements in California cities: Climate Impact of Adopting Cool Pavement. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2017JD026845.
Mohegh, Arash, Rosado, Pablo, Jin, Ling, Millstein, Dev, Levinson, Ronnen, & Ban-Weiss, George. Modeling the climate impacts of deploying solar reflective cool pavements in California cities: Climate Impact of Adopting Cool Pavement. United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD026845.
Mohegh, Arash, Rosado, Pablo, Jin, Ling, Millstein, Dev, Levinson, Ronnen, and Ban-Weiss, George. Sat . "Modeling the climate impacts of deploying solar reflective cool pavements in California cities: Climate Impact of Adopting Cool Pavement". United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD026845.
@article{osti_1402150,
title = {Modeling the climate impacts of deploying solar reflective cool pavements in California cities: Climate Impact of Adopting Cool Pavement},
author = {Mohegh, Arash and Rosado, Pablo and Jin, Ling and Millstein, Dev and Levinson, Ronnen and Ban-Weiss, George},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2017JD026845},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},
number = 13,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 8, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • The climate warming effects of accelerated urbanization along with projected global climate change raise an urgent need for sustainable mitigation and adaptation strategies to cool urban climates. Our modeling results show that historical urbanization in the Los Angeles and San Diego metropolitan areas has increased daytime urban air temperature by 1.3 °C, in part due to a weakening of the onshore sea breeze circulation. We find that metropolis-wide adoption of cool roofs can meaningfully offset this daytime warming, reducing temperatures by 0.9 °C relative to a case without cool roofs. Residential cool roofs were responsible for 67% of the cooling.more » Nocturnal temperature increases of 3.1 °C from urbanization were larger than daytime warming, while nocturnal temperature reductions from cool roofs of 0.5 °C were weaker than corresponding daytime reductions. We further show that cool roof deployment could partially counter the local impacts of global climate change in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Assuming a scenario in which there are dramatic decreases in greenhouse gas emissions in the 21st century (RCP2.6), mid- and end-of-century temperature increases from global change relative to current climate are similarly reduced by cool roofs from 1.4 °C to 0.6 °C. Assuming a scenario with continued emissions increases throughout the century (RCP8.5), mid-century warming is significantly reduced by cool roofs from 2.0 °C to 1.0 °C. The end-century warming, however, is significantly offset only in small localized areas containing mostly industrial/commercial buildings where cool roofs with the highest albedo are adopted. We conclude that metropolis-wide adoption of cool roofs can play an important role in mitigating the urban heat island effect, and offsetting near-term local warming from global climate change. Global-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are the only way of avoiding long-term warming, however. We further suggest that both climate mitigation and adaptation can be pursued simultaneously using 'cool photovoltaics'.« less
  • The climate warming effects of accelerated urbanization along with projected global climate change raise an urgent need for sustainable mitigation and adaptation strategies to cool urban climates. Our modeling results show that historical urbanization in the Los Angeles and San Diego metropolitan areas has increased daytime urban air temperature by 1.3 °C, in part due to a weakening of the onshore sea breeze circulation. We find that metropolis-wide adoption of cool roofs can meaningfully offset this daytime warming, reducing temperatures by 0.9 °C relative to a case without cool roofs. Residential cool roofs were responsible for 67% of the cooling.more » Nocturnal temperature increases of 3.1 °C from urbanization were larger than daytime warming, while nocturnal temperature reductions from cool roofs of 0.5 °C were weaker than corresponding daytime reductions. We further show that cool roof deployment could partially counter the local impacts of global climate change in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Assuming a scenario in which there are dramatic decreases in greenhouse gas emissions in the 21st century (RCP2.6), mid- and end-of-century temperature increases from global change relative to current climate are similarly reduced by cool roofs from 1.4 °C to 0.6 °C. Assuming a scenario with continued emissions increases throughout the century (RCP8.5), mid-century warming is significantly reduced by cool roofs from 2.0 °C to 1.0 °C. The end-century warming, however, is significantly offset only in small localized areas containing mostly industrial/commercial buildings where cool roofs with the highest albedo are adopted. We conclude that metropolis-wide adoption of cool roofs can play an important role in mitigating the urban heat island effect, and offsetting near-term local warming from global climate change. Global-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are the only way of avoiding long-term warming, however. We further suggest that both climate mitigation and adaptation can be pursued simultaneously using 'cool photovoltaics'.« less