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Title: Diagnostics and Testing to Assess the Behavior of Organic Materials at High Heat Flux.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA)
OSTI Identifier:
1401948
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-10464C
648373
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the The 2017 International Association of Fire Safety Science Symposium held June 12-16, 2017 in Lund, Sweden.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Brown, Alexander, Anderson, Ryan Robert, Tanbakuchi, Anthony, and Coombs, Deshawn. Diagnostics and Testing to Assess the Behavior of Organic Materials at High Heat Flux.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Brown, Alexander, Anderson, Ryan Robert, Tanbakuchi, Anthony, & Coombs, Deshawn. Diagnostics and Testing to Assess the Behavior of Organic Materials at High Heat Flux.. United States.
Brown, Alexander, Anderson, Ryan Robert, Tanbakuchi, Anthony, and Coombs, Deshawn. 2016. "Diagnostics and Testing to Assess the Behavior of Organic Materials at High Heat Flux.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1401948.
@article{osti_1401948,
title = {Diagnostics and Testing to Assess the Behavior of Organic Materials at High Heat Flux.},
author = {Brown, Alexander and Anderson, Ryan Robert and Tanbakuchi, Anthony and Coombs, Deshawn},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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