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Title: A High Power Rechargeable Nonaqueous Multivalent Zn/V 2 O 5 Battery

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [1]
  1. Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA
  2. Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA, Material Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA
  3. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1401869
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Energy Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 24; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 18:08:13; Journal ID: ISSN 1614-6832
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Senguttuvan, Premkumar, Han, Sang-Don, Kim, Soojeong, Lipson, Albert L., Tepavcevic, Sanja, Fister, Timothy T., Bloom, Ira D., Burrell, Anthony K., and Johnson, Christopher S. A High Power Rechargeable Nonaqueous Multivalent Zn/V 2 O 5 Battery. Germany: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/aenm.201600826.
Senguttuvan, Premkumar, Han, Sang-Don, Kim, Soojeong, Lipson, Albert L., Tepavcevic, Sanja, Fister, Timothy T., Bloom, Ira D., Burrell, Anthony K., & Johnson, Christopher S. A High Power Rechargeable Nonaqueous Multivalent Zn/V 2 O 5 Battery. Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201600826.
Senguttuvan, Premkumar, Han, Sang-Don, Kim, Soojeong, Lipson, Albert L., Tepavcevic, Sanja, Fister, Timothy T., Bloom, Ira D., Burrell, Anthony K., and Johnson, Christopher S. 2016. "A High Power Rechargeable Nonaqueous Multivalent Zn/V 2 O 5 Battery". Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201600826.
@article{osti_1401869,
title = {A High Power Rechargeable Nonaqueous Multivalent Zn/V 2 O 5 Battery},
author = {Senguttuvan, Premkumar and Han, Sang-Don and Kim, Soojeong and Lipson, Albert L. and Tepavcevic, Sanja and Fister, Timothy T. and Bloom, Ira D. and Burrell, Anthony K. and Johnson, Christopher S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/aenm.201600826},
journal = {Advanced Energy Materials},
number = 24,
volume = 6,
place = {Germany},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/aenm.201600826

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  • A beyond Li-ion battery based on Zn metal, aprotic electrolyte, and a hydrated bilayered V2O5 cathode with a large gallery spacing of 11–13 Å is introduced. The battery exhibits high 20 C rate capability with good specific capacity of 130 mA h g-1. This work provides some design rules for Zn intercalation behavior in host electrodes in a nonaqueous environment.
  • A nonaqueous coprecipitation process has been developed to prepare controlled stoichiometry lithium cobalt oxide precipitates. The process involved mixing a methanolic LiCo-(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution with a methanolic solution containing tetramethylammonium oxalate as a precipitating agent. The resulting oxalates were readily converted to phase-pure lithium cobalt oxide at 800 C under an oxygen atmosphere. The various starting solutions, oxalate precipitates, and the resulting oxides have been extensively characterized using a variety of techniques, including multinuclear NMR, TGA/DTA, EPR, and XRD analyses. Results indicate that the strong interaction between the metals (Li and Co) that occurred in solution was maintained duringmore » precipitation. The calcined precipitate revealed that the desired LiCoO{sub 2} phase was formed at 800 C under an O{sub 2} atmosphere. When electrochemically cycled, the material exhibited an initial capacity of {approximately}133 (mA h)/g with a fade of 0.02% in capacity per cycle.« less
  • Unlike the more established lithium-ion based energy storage chemistries, the complex intercalation chemistry of multivalent cations in a host lattice is not well understood, especially the relationship between the intercalating species solution chemistry and the prevalence and type of side reactions. Among multivalent metals, a promising model system can be based on nonaqueous Zn2+ ion chemistry. Several examples of these systems support the use of a Zn metal anode, and reversible intercalation cathodes have been reported. This study utilizes a combination of analytical tools to probe the chemistry of a nanostructured delta-MnO2 cathode in association with a nonaqueous acetonitrile-Zn(TFSI)(2) electrolytemore » and a Zn metal anode. As many of the issues related to understanding a multivalent battery relate to the electrolyte electrode interface, the high surface area of a nanostructured cathode provides a significant interface between the electrolyte and cathode host that maximizes the spectroscopic signal of any side reactions or minor mechanistic pathways. Numerous factors affecting capacity fade and issues associated with the second phase formation including Mn dissolution in heavily cycled Zn/delta-MnO2 cells are presented including dramatic mechanistic differences in the storage mechanism of this couple when compared to similar aqueous electrolytes are noted.« less
  • Unlike the more established lithium-ion based energy storage chemistries, the complex intercalation chemistry of multivalent cations in a host lattice is not well understood, especially the relationship between the intercalating species solution chemistry and the prevalence and type of side reactions. Among multivalent metals, a promising model system can be based on nonaqueous Zn 2+ ion chemistry. There are several examples of these systems support the use of a Zn metal anode, and reversible intercalation cathodes have been reported. Our study utilizes a combination of analytical tools to probe the chemistry of a nanostructured δ-MnO 2 cathode in association withmore » a nonaqueous acetonitrile–Zn(TFSI) 2 electrolyte and a Zn metal anode. As many of the issues related to understanding a multivalent battery relate to the electrolyte–electrode interface, the high surface area of a nanostructured cathode provides a significant interface between the electrolyte and cathode host that maximizes the spectroscopic signal of any side reactions or minor mechanistic pathways. There are numerous factors affecting capacity fade and issues associated with the second phase formation including Mn dissolution in heavily cycled Zn/δ-MnO 2 cells are presented including dramatic mechanistic differences in the storage mechanism of this couple when compared to similar aqueous electrolytes are noted.« less
  • Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted considerable attention because of their potential high energy density and low cost. However, their development has been severely hindered because of the lack of appropriate cathode materials. Here we report a rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery, in which the soluble iodine reacts with Mg 2+ to form a soluble intermediate and then an insoluble final product magnesium iodide. The liquid–solid two-phase reaction pathway circumvents solid-state Mg 2+ diffusion and ensures a large interfacial reaction area, leading to fast reaction kinetics and high reaction reversibility. As a result, the rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery shows a better rate capability (180more » mAh g –1 at 0.5 C and 140 mAh g –1 at 1 C) and a higher energy density (~400 Wh kg –1) than all other reported rechargeable magnesium batteries using intercalation cathodes. As a result, this study demonstrates that the liquid–solid two-phase reaction mechanism is promising in addressing the kinetic limitation of rechargeable magnesium batteries.« less