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Title: Mesoscale convective systems over the Amazon basin. Part I: climatological aspects: AMAZON'S MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS CLIMATOLOGY

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences, University of São Paulo (USP), Brazil
  2. Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California (UCLA), Los Angeles CA USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401808
Grant/Contract Number:
GoAmazon2014/5
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Climatology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-02 02:12:17; Journal ID: ISSN 0899-8418
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Rehbein, Amanda, Ambrizzi, Tercio, and Mechoso, Carlos Roberto. Mesoscale convective systems over the Amazon basin. Part I: climatological aspects: AMAZON'S MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS CLIMATOLOGY. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/joc.5171.
Rehbein, Amanda, Ambrizzi, Tercio, & Mechoso, Carlos Roberto. Mesoscale convective systems over the Amazon basin. Part I: climatological aspects: AMAZON'S MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS CLIMATOLOGY. United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/joc.5171.
Rehbein, Amanda, Ambrizzi, Tercio, and Mechoso, Carlos Roberto. Sun . "Mesoscale convective systems over the Amazon basin. Part I: climatological aspects: AMAZON'S MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS CLIMATOLOGY". United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/joc.5171.
@article{osti_1401808,
title = {Mesoscale convective systems over the Amazon basin. Part I: climatological aspects: AMAZON'S MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS CLIMATOLOGY},
author = {Rehbein, Amanda and Ambrizzi, Tercio and Mechoso, Carlos Roberto},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/joc.5171},
journal = {International Journal of Climatology},
number = 1,
volume = 38,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sun Jul 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Jul 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 2, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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