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Title: Deactivation of a Cobalt Catalyst for Water Reduction through Valence Tautomerism

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, 5101 Cass Ave Detroit MI 48202 USA
  2. Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, 5101 Cass Ave Detroit MI 48202 USA, Current address: Department of Chemistry, Hofstra University, Berliner Hall Hempstead NY 11549 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1401787
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0001907
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Chemistry - A European Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 39; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:48:09; Journal ID: ISSN 0947-6539
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Baydoun, Habib, Mazumder, Shivnath, Schlegel, H. Bernhard, and Verani, Cláudio N.. Deactivation of a Cobalt Catalyst for Water Reduction through Valence Tautomerism. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/chem.201701783.
Baydoun, Habib, Mazumder, Shivnath, Schlegel, H. Bernhard, & Verani, Cláudio N.. Deactivation of a Cobalt Catalyst for Water Reduction through Valence Tautomerism. Germany. doi:10.1002/chem.201701783.
Baydoun, Habib, Mazumder, Shivnath, Schlegel, H. Bernhard, and Verani, Cláudio N.. Mon . "Deactivation of a Cobalt Catalyst for Water Reduction through Valence Tautomerism". Germany. doi:10.1002/chem.201701783.
@article{osti_1401787,
title = {Deactivation of a Cobalt Catalyst for Water Reduction through Valence Tautomerism},
author = {Baydoun, Habib and Mazumder, Shivnath and Schlegel, H. Bernhard and Verani, Cláudio N.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/chem.201701783},
journal = {Chemistry - A European Journal},
number = 39,
volume = 23,
place = {Germany},
year = {Mon May 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/chem.201701783

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