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Title: Systematic Study of Open-Shell Trigonal Pyramidal Transition-Metal Complexes with a Rigid-Ligand Scaffold

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3 30-060 Kraków Poland, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station Texas 77842-3012 USA
  2. Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station Texas 77842-3012 USA
  3. Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3 30-060 Kraków Poland
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401737
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-02ER45999; SC0012582
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Chemistry - A European Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 15; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:57:22; Journal ID: ISSN 0947-6539
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Pinkowicz, Dawid, Birk, Francisco J., Magott, Michał, Schulte, Kelsey, and Dunbar, Kim R.. Systematic Study of Open-Shell Trigonal Pyramidal Transition-Metal Complexes with a Rigid-Ligand Scaffold. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/chem.201605528.
Pinkowicz, Dawid, Birk, Francisco J., Magott, Michał, Schulte, Kelsey, & Dunbar, Kim R.. Systematic Study of Open-Shell Trigonal Pyramidal Transition-Metal Complexes with a Rigid-Ligand Scaffold. Germany. doi:10.1002/chem.201605528.
Pinkowicz, Dawid, Birk, Francisco J., Magott, Michał, Schulte, Kelsey, and Dunbar, Kim R.. Tue . "Systematic Study of Open-Shell Trigonal Pyramidal Transition-Metal Complexes with a Rigid-Ligand Scaffold". Germany. doi:10.1002/chem.201605528.
@article{osti_1401737,
title = {Systematic Study of Open-Shell Trigonal Pyramidal Transition-Metal Complexes with a Rigid-Ligand Scaffold},
author = {Pinkowicz, Dawid and Birk, Francisco J. and Magott, Michał and Schulte, Kelsey and Dunbar, Kim R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/chem.201605528},
journal = {Chemistry - A European Journal},
number = 15,
volume = 23,
place = {Germany},
year = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/chem.201605528

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
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