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Title: Drivers of genetic differentiation in a generalist insect-pollinated herb across spatial scales

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Plant Biology, CIBIO/InBio, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Laboratório Associado, Universidade do Porto, Campus Agrário de Vairão 4485-661 Vairão Portugal, Departamento de Genética, Universidad de Granada, Granada Spain
  2. Plant Biology, CIBIO/InBio, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Laboratório Associado, Universidade do Porto, Campus Agrário de Vairão 4485-661 Vairão Portugal
  3. Departamento de Genética, Universidad de Granada, Granada Spain, Biological and Environmental Sciences, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA UK
  4. CREAF (Centre de Recerca Ecològica i Aplicacions Forestals), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra Barcelona Spain
  5. Departamento de Genética, Universidad de Granada, Granada Spain
  6. Departamento de Ecología, Universidad de Granada, Granada Spain, Departamento de Ecología Funcional y Evolutiva, Estación Experimental de Zonas Aridas (EEZACSIC), Almería Spain
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1401735
Grant/Contract Number:
PTDC/BIA-ECS/116521/2010
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Molecular Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:41:51; Journal ID: ISSN 0962-1083
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Muñoz-Pajares, A. J., García, C., Abdelaziz, M., Bosch, J., Perfectti, F., and Gómez, J. M.. Drivers of genetic differentiation in a generalist insect-pollinated herb across spatial scales. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/mec.13971.
Muñoz-Pajares, A. J., García, C., Abdelaziz, M., Bosch, J., Perfectti, F., & Gómez, J. M.. Drivers of genetic differentiation in a generalist insect-pollinated herb across spatial scales. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/mec.13971.
Muñoz-Pajares, A. J., García, C., Abdelaziz, M., Bosch, J., Perfectti, F., and Gómez, J. M.. Fri . "Drivers of genetic differentiation in a generalist insect-pollinated herb across spatial scales". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/mec.13971.
@article{osti_1401735,
title = {Drivers of genetic differentiation in a generalist insect-pollinated herb across spatial scales},
author = {Muñoz-Pajares, A. J. and García, C. and Abdelaziz, M. and Bosch, J. and Perfectti, F. and Gómez, J. M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/mec.13971},
journal = {Molecular Ecology},
number = 6,
volume = 26,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/mec.13971

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