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Title: Crystallographic insight into the evolutionary origins of xyloglucan endotransglycosylases and endohydrolases

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, 2185 East Mall Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4 Canada, Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1 Canada
  2. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, 2350 Health Sciences Mall Vancouver BC V6T 1Z3 Canada
  3. Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, 2185 East Mall Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4 Canada, Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1 Canada, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, 2350 Health Sciences Mall Vancouver BC V6T 1Z3 Canada, Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Boulevard Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4 Canada
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1401723
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The Plant Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:57:05; Journal ID: ISSN 0960-7412
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

McGregor, Nicholas, Yin, Victor, Tung, Ching-Chieh, Van Petegem, Filip, and Brumer, Harry. Crystallographic insight into the evolutionary origins of xyloglucan endotransglycosylases and endohydrolases. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/tpj.13421.
McGregor, Nicholas, Yin, Victor, Tung, Ching-Chieh, Van Petegem, Filip, & Brumer, Harry. Crystallographic insight into the evolutionary origins of xyloglucan endotransglycosylases and endohydrolases. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/tpj.13421.
McGregor, Nicholas, Yin, Victor, Tung, Ching-Chieh, Van Petegem, Filip, and Brumer, Harry. Sat . "Crystallographic insight into the evolutionary origins of xyloglucan endotransglycosylases and endohydrolases". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/tpj.13421.
@article{osti_1401723,
title = {Crystallographic insight into the evolutionary origins of xyloglucan endotransglycosylases and endohydrolases},
author = {McGregor, Nicholas and Yin, Victor and Tung, Ching-Chieh and Van Petegem, Filip and Brumer, Harry},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/tpj.13421},
journal = {The Plant Journal},
number = 4,
volume = 89,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sat Feb 11 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sat Feb 11 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/tpj.13421

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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