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Title: Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71 Neuchatel 2002 Switzerland
  2. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), KAUST Solar Center (KSC), Thuwal 23955-6900 Saudi Arabia
  3. Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley CA 94720 USA
  4. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley CA 94720 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401534
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Electronic Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:14:24; Journal ID: ISSN 2199-160X
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Morales-Masis, Monica, De Wolf, Stefaan, Woods-Robinson, Rachel, Ager, Joel W., and Ballif, Christophe. Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/aelm.201600529.
Morales-Masis, Monica, De Wolf, Stefaan, Woods-Robinson, Rachel, Ager, Joel W., & Ballif, Christophe. Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics. United States. doi:10.1002/aelm.201600529.
Morales-Masis, Monica, De Wolf, Stefaan, Woods-Robinson, Rachel, Ager, Joel W., and Ballif, Christophe. Thu . "Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics". United States. doi:10.1002/aelm.201600529.
@article{osti_1401534,
title = {Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics},
author = {Morales-Masis, Monica and De Wolf, Stefaan and Woods-Robinson, Rachel and Ager, Joel W. and Ballif, Christophe},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/aelm.201600529},
journal = {Advanced Electronic Materials},
number = 5,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/aelm.201600529

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 11works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Here, we present two strategies to minimize laser damage in transparent conductive films. The first consists of improving heat dissipation by selection of substrates with high thermal diffusivity or by addition of capping layer heatsinks. The second is reduction of bulk energy absorption by lowering free carrier density and increasing mobility, while maintaining film conductance with thicker films. Multi-pulse laser damage tests were performed on tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films configured to improve optical lifetime damage performance. Conditions where improvements were not observed are also described. Finally, when bulk heating is not the dominant damage process, discrete defect-induced damage limitsmore » damage behavior.« less
  • Here, we present two strategies to minimize laser damage in transparent conductive films. The first consists of improving heat dissipation by selection of substrates with high thermal diffusivity or by addition of capping layer heatsinks. The second is reduction of bulk energy absorption by lowering free carrier density and increasing mobility, while maintaining film conductance with thicker films. Multi-pulse laser damage tests were performed on tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films configured to improve optical lifetime damage performance. Conditions where improvements were not observed are also described. Finally, when bulk heating is not the dominant damage process, discrete defect-induced damage limitsmore » damage behavior.« less
  • A fabrication method for transparent ambipolar organic thin film transistors with transparent Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ag/Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} (SAS) source and drain electrodes has been developed. A pentacene/N,N′-ditridecylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic di-imide (PTCDI-C13) bilayer heterojunction is used as the active semiconductor. The electrodes are deposited by room temperature electron beam evaporation. The devices are fabricated without damaging the active layers. The SAS electrodes have high transmittance (82.5%) and low sheet resistance (8 Ω/sq). High performance devices with hole and electron mobilities of 0.3 cm{sup 2}/V s and 0.027 cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively, and average visible range transmittance of 72% were obtained. These transistors have potential for transparent logicmore » integrated circuit applications.« less
  • Photogalvanic cells based on the photoinduced redox reactions of two redox couples can convert solar energy. However, their conversion efficiency is poor because of the recombination of photochemically produced active species before they reach the electrodes and the two-way electrode processes of those species. In an attempt to improve the conversion efficiency, the use of closely spaced electrodes structures has been proposed, such as a thin-layer photocell with a transparent electrode. A lithologic fabrication method for a new interdigitated array microelectrode (IDA) consisting of optically transparent (ITO) and nontransparent (Pt) arrays of band electrodes on a quartz substrate is presented.more » The new IDA is applied to the Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 3+} photogalvanic system. The effective separation of photoinduced active species between very closely spaced electrodes is achieved by utilizing the shadow of the nontransparent electrode generated by illumination from the rear of the IDA. This back-illumination method using the new IDA is effective in increasing the conversion efficiency.« less
  • Thin solid SnO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2}/Mo (10%, 2:1 and 1:1) films with an ion-storage capacity of 20 to 30 mC/cm{sup 2} and weakly expressed cathodic electrochromism were deposited using the dip-coating technique. The films were deposited from peroxo sols prepared by reacting SnCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O and a metallic molybdenum precursor with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thermogravimetric, surface area (BET), x-ray diffraction, and IR spectroscopic measurements of films heat-treated at 500 C revealed a nanocrystalline (grain size {approximately}30 {angstrom}) cassiterite structure with a large surface area ({approximately}60 to 70 m{sup 2}/g). The electrochemical properties of the films were studiedmore » in a 1 M LiClO{sub 4}/propylene carbonate electrolyte using cyclic voltammetry (CV) at different scanning rates (0.1 to 200 mV/s). Electrochromic properties, measured in situ with ultraviolet-visible measurements, revealed that the coloring/bleaching changes accompanying insertion/extraction of Li{sup +} ion processes are 10 to 15% for SnO{sub 2}/Mo (1:1) films but decrease to a few percent with decreasing Mo content. Low-scan-rate CV measurements confirmed the presence of two different redox processes: Sn{sup 4+}/Sn{sup 2+} and Mo{sup 6+}/Mo{sup 5+}. This was confirmed from the ex situ IR spectroelectrochemical measurements of films charged/discharged to different extents. IR spectra of films heat-treated at 500 C in a vacuum also showed that SnO{sub 2}/Mo (2:1) films contain Broensted acidic protons. These films, because of their low coloration efficiency (2 to 10 cm{sup 2}/C), are promising counterelectrodes for electrochromic devices with light reflection modulation.« less