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Title: Beyond thermal limits: comprehensive metrics of performance identify key axes of thermal adaptation in ants

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];
  1. Department of Applied Ecology and Keck Center for Behavioral Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC 27695 USA, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh NC 27601 USA
  2. Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH 44106 USA
  3. Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen Denmark, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, Burlington VT 05405 USA
  4. Department of Applied Ecology and Keck Center for Behavioral Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC 27695 USA, Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen Denmark
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401497
Grant/Contract Number:
DEFG02-08ER64510
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Functional Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:25:04; Journal ID: ISSN 0269-8463
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Penick, Clint A., Diamond, Sarah E., Sanders, Nathan J., Dunn, Robert R., and Rezende, ed., Enrico. Beyond thermal limits: comprehensive metrics of performance identify key axes of thermal adaptation in ants. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/1365-2435.12818.
Penick, Clint A., Diamond, Sarah E., Sanders, Nathan J., Dunn, Robert R., & Rezende, ed., Enrico. Beyond thermal limits: comprehensive metrics of performance identify key axes of thermal adaptation in ants. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/1365-2435.12818.
Penick, Clint A., Diamond, Sarah E., Sanders, Nathan J., Dunn, Robert R., and Rezende, ed., Enrico. Tue . "Beyond thermal limits: comprehensive metrics of performance identify key axes of thermal adaptation in ants". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/1365-2435.12818.
@article{osti_1401497,
title = {Beyond thermal limits: comprehensive metrics of performance identify key axes of thermal adaptation in ants},
author = {Penick, Clint A. and Diamond, Sarah E. and Sanders, Nathan J. and Dunn, Robert R. and Rezende, ed., Enrico},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/1365-2435.12818},
journal = {Functional Ecology},
number = 5,
volume = 31,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Tue Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/1365-2435.12818

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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