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Title: Pre-mRNA splicing repression triggers abiotic stress signaling in plants

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5];  [6];  [4];  [2];  [5];  [1]
  1. Laboratory for Genome Engineering, Division of Biological Sciences, 4700 King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 Saudi Arabia
  2. Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas-Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, ES-46022 Valencia Spain
  3. Department of Biology and Biotechnology Graduate Program, American University in Cairo, New Cairo 11835 Egypt
  4. Division of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 Saudi Arabia
  5. Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, Rua da Quinta Grande 6 2780-156 Oeiras Portugal
  6. Molecular Plant Biology, Department of Biochemistry, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku Finland
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1401484
Grant/Contract Number:
PTDC/BIA-PLA/1084/2014
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The Plant Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 2; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:01:20; Journal ID: ISSN 0960-7412
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ling, Yu, Alshareef, Sahar, Butt, Haroon, Lozano-Juste, Jorge, Li, Lixin, Galal, Aya A., Moustafa, Ahmed, Momin, Afaque A., Tashkandi, Manal, Richardson, Dale N., Fujii, Hiroaki, Arold, Stefan, Rodriguez, Pedro L., Duque, Paula, and Mahfouz, Magdy M. Pre-mRNA splicing repression triggers abiotic stress signaling in plants. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/tpj.13383.
Ling, Yu, Alshareef, Sahar, Butt, Haroon, Lozano-Juste, Jorge, Li, Lixin, Galal, Aya A., Moustafa, Ahmed, Momin, Afaque A., Tashkandi, Manal, Richardson, Dale N., Fujii, Hiroaki, Arold, Stefan, Rodriguez, Pedro L., Duque, Paula, & Mahfouz, Magdy M. Pre-mRNA splicing repression triggers abiotic stress signaling in plants. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/tpj.13383.
Ling, Yu, Alshareef, Sahar, Butt, Haroon, Lozano-Juste, Jorge, Li, Lixin, Galal, Aya A., Moustafa, Ahmed, Momin, Afaque A., Tashkandi, Manal, Richardson, Dale N., Fujii, Hiroaki, Arold, Stefan, Rodriguez, Pedro L., Duque, Paula, and Mahfouz, Magdy M. Tue . "Pre-mRNA splicing repression triggers abiotic stress signaling in plants". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/tpj.13383.
@article{osti_1401484,
title = {Pre-mRNA splicing repression triggers abiotic stress signaling in plants},
author = {Ling, Yu and Alshareef, Sahar and Butt, Haroon and Lozano-Juste, Jorge and Li, Lixin and Galal, Aya A. and Moustafa, Ahmed and Momin, Afaque A. and Tashkandi, Manal and Richardson, Dale N. and Fujii, Hiroaki and Arold, Stefan and Rodriguez, Pedro L. and Duque, Paula and Mahfouz, Magdy M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/tpj.13383},
journal = {The Plant Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 89,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Tue Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/tpj.13383

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 6works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • The spliced form of MuSVts110 viral RNA is approximately 20-fold more abundant at growth temperatures of 33/sup 0/C or lower than at 37 to 41/sup 0/C. This difference is due to changes in the efficiency of MuSVts110 RNA splicing rather than selective thermolability of the spliced species at 37 to 41/sup 0/C or general thermosensitivity of RNA splicing in MuSVts110-infected cells. Moreover, RNA transcribed from MuSVts110 DNA introduced into a variety of cell lines is spliced in a temperature-sensitive fashion, suggesting that the structure of the viral RNA controls the efficiency of the event. The authors exploited this novel splicingmore » event to study the cleavage and ligation events during splicing in vivo. No spliced viral mRNA or splicing intermediates were observed in MuSVts110-infected cells (6m2 cells) at 39/sup 0/C. However, after a short (about 30-min) lag following a shift to 33/sup 0/C, viral pre-mRNA cleaved at the 5' splice site began to accumulate. Ligated exons were not detected until about 60 min following the initial detection of cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting that these two splicing reactions did not occur concurrently. Splicing of viral RNA in the MuSVts110 revertant 54-5A4, which lacks the sequence -AG/TGT- at the usual 3' splice site, was studied. Cleavage at the 5' splice site in the revertant viral RNA proceeded in a temperature-sensitive fashion. No novel cryptic 3' splice sites were activated; however, splicing at an alternate upstream 3' splice site used at low efficiency in normal MuSVts110 RNA was increased to a level close to that of 5'-splice-site cleavage in the revertant viral RNA.« less
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