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Title: Characterization of a Clostridium beijerinckii spo0A mutant and its application for butyl butyrate production: Butyl Butyrate Production by C. beijerinckii Strain

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4]
  1. Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois 61801, Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois
  2. Biosystems Engineering Department, Auburn University, Auburn Alabama
  3. Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois, Departments of Bioengineering and Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois
  4. Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois 61801, The Integrated Bioprocessing Research Laboratory (IBRL), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois 61801
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401466
Grant/Contract Number:
#2011-01219
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biotechnology and Bioengineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:06:26; Journal ID: ISSN 0006-3592
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Seo, Seung-Oh, Wang, Yi, Lu, Ting, Jin, Yong-Su, and Blaschek, Hans P. Characterization of a Clostridium beijerinckii spo0A mutant and its application for butyl butyrate production: Butyl Butyrate Production by C. beijerinckii Strain. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/bit.26057.
Seo, Seung-Oh, Wang, Yi, Lu, Ting, Jin, Yong-Su, & Blaschek, Hans P. Characterization of a Clostridium beijerinckii spo0A mutant and its application for butyl butyrate production: Butyl Butyrate Production by C. beijerinckii Strain. United States. doi:10.1002/bit.26057.
Seo, Seung-Oh, Wang, Yi, Lu, Ting, Jin, Yong-Su, and Blaschek, Hans P. 2016. "Characterization of a Clostridium beijerinckii spo0A mutant and its application for butyl butyrate production: Butyl Butyrate Production by C. beijerinckii Strain". United States. doi:10.1002/bit.26057.
@article{osti_1401466,
title = {Characterization of a Clostridium beijerinckii spo0A mutant and its application for butyl butyrate production: Butyl Butyrate Production by C. beijerinckii Strain},
author = {Seo, Seung-Oh and Wang, Yi and Lu, Ting and Jin, Yong-Su and Blaschek, Hans P.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/bit.26057},
journal = {Biotechnology and Bioengineering},
number = 1,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/bit.26057

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • A silicone membrane was used to study butanol separation from model butanol solutions and fermentation broth. Depending upon the butanol feed concentration in the model solution and pervaporation conditions, butanol selectivities of 20.88--68.32 and flux values of 158.7--215.4 g m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} were achieved. Higher flux values were obtained at higher butanol concentrations using air as sweep gas. In an integrated process of butanol fermentation--recovery, solvent productivities were improved to 200% of the control batch fermentation productivities. In a batch reactor the hyper-butanol-producing mutant strain C. beijerinckii BA101 utilized 57.3 g/L glucose and produced 24.2 g/L total solvents, whilemore » in the integrated process it produced 51.5 g/L (culture volume) total solvents. Concentrated glucose medium was also fermented. The C. beijerinckii BA101 mutant strain was not negatively affected by the pervaporative conditions. In the integrated experiment, acids were not produced. With the active fermentation broth, butanol selectivity was reduced by a factor of 2--3. However, the membrane flux was not affected by the active fermentation broth. The butanol permeate concentration ranged from 26.4 to 95.4 g/L, depending upon butanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Since the permeate of most membranes contains acetone, butanol, and ethanol, it is suggested that distillation be used for further purification.« less
  • Thirty-four strains representing 15 species of anaerobic bacteria were screened for acetone, isopropanol, and n-butanol (solvent) production. Under our culture conditions, several strains of Clostridium beijerinckii and C. aurantibutyricum produced at least 40 mM n-butanol (C. acetobutylicum strains produced up to 41 mM n-butanol under similar conditions). Both solvent-producing and non-solvent-producing strains of C. beijerinckii have high DNA homology with a reference strain of C. beijerinckii. Strains labeled ''Clostridium butylicum'' are phenotypically similar to C. beijerinckii and showed at least 78% DNA homology to a reference strain of C. beijerinckii. Therefore, these ''C. butylicum'' strains are members of C. beijerinckii.more » An earlier DNA homology study has shown that C. beijerinckii, C. aurantibutyricum, and C. acetobutylicum are distinct species.« less
  • Clostridium beijerinckii (Clostridium butylicum) NRRL B592 and NRRL B593 were grown in batch cultures without pH control. The use of more sensitive and accurate procedures for the determination of solvents in cultures led to the recognition of the onset of solvent production about 2 h earlier than the previously assigned point and at a higher culture pH for both strains. Reliable assays for solvent-forming enzyme activities in cell extracts have also been developed. The results showed that activities of solvent-forming enzymes in strain NRRL B592 started to increase about 1 h before the measured onset of solvent production and thatmore » the increase in activities of solvent-forming enzymes was not simultaneous. The degree of increase of these enzyme activities for both strains ranged from 2- to 165-fold, with acetoacetate decarboxylase and butanol-isopropanol dehydrogenase showing the largest activity increases. However, the pattern of increase of enzyme activities differed significantly in the two strains of C. beijerinckii. When an increase in solvent-forming enzyme activities was first detected in strain NRRL B592, the culture pH was at 5.7 and the concentrations of total acetic and butyric acids were 5.2 and 3.6 mM, respectively. For strain NRRL B593, the corresponding pH was 5.5. Thus, the culture conditions immediately preceding the expression of solvent-forming enzyme activities differed significantly from those that have been correlated with the production of solvents at later stages of growth.« less
  • Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahliimore » chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H-2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. IMPORTANCE The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors for C. ljungdahlii include carbon monoxide, which can be derived from industrial waste gases or the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to syngas, as well as hydrogen, another syngas component. The finding that carbon and electron flow in C. ljungdahlii can be diverted from the production of acetate to butyrate synthesis is an important step toward the goal of renewable commodity production from carbon dioxide with this organism.« less