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Title: Caffeine exposure alters adenosine system and neurochemical markers during retinal development

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Neurobiology of the Retina Laboratory, Department of Neurobiology and Program of Neurosciences, Institute of Biology, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói Rio de Janeiro Brazil, Laboratory of Cellular Neurobiology, Department of Neurobiology and Program of Neurosciences, Institute of Biology, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói Rio de Janeiro Brazil
  2. Neurobiology of the Retina Laboratory, Department of Neurobiology and Program of Neurosciences, Institute of Biology, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói Rio de Janeiro Brazil
  3. Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde (i3S) and Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular (IBMC), Universidade do Porto, Porto Portugal
  4. Laboratory of Cellular Neurobiology, Department of Neurobiology and Program of Neurosciences, Institute of Biology, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói Rio de Janeiro Brazil
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1401440
Grant/Contract Number:
SFRH/BPD/91833/2012
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Neurochemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 138; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:26:47; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3042
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Brito, Rafael, Pereira-Figueiredo, Danniel, Socodato, Renato, Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto, and Calaza, Karin C. Caffeine exposure alters adenosine system and neurochemical markers during retinal development. United Kingdom: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1111/jnc.13683.
Brito, Rafael, Pereira-Figueiredo, Danniel, Socodato, Renato, Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto, & Calaza, Karin C. Caffeine exposure alters adenosine system and neurochemical markers during retinal development. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/jnc.13683.
Brito, Rafael, Pereira-Figueiredo, Danniel, Socodato, Renato, Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto, and Calaza, Karin C. 2016. "Caffeine exposure alters adenosine system and neurochemical markers during retinal development". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/jnc.13683.
@article{osti_1401440,
title = {Caffeine exposure alters adenosine system and neurochemical markers during retinal development},
author = {Brito, Rafael and Pereira-Figueiredo, Danniel and Socodato, Renato and Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto and Calaza, Karin C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/jnc.13683},
journal = {Journal of Neurochemistry},
number = 4,
volume = 138,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/jnc.13683

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  • Purpose: The first goal of this study was to determine the influence of the dose-dependent effects of intermittent ethanol intoxication on cerebral neurochemical responses among sham controls and low- and high-dose-ethanol-exposed rats with ex vivo high-resolution spectra. The second goal of this study was to determine the correlations between the metabolite-metabolite levels (pairs-of-metabolite levels) from all of the individual data from the frontal cortex of the intermittent ethanol-intoxicated rats. Methods: Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups. Twenty rats in the LDE (n = 10) and the HDE (n = 10) groups received ethanol doses of 1.5 g/kgmore » and 2.5 g/kg, respectively, through oral gavage every 8-h for 4 days. At the end of the 4-day intermittent ethanol exposure, one-dimensional ex vivo 500-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were acquired from 30 samples of the frontal cortex region (from the 3 groups). Results: Normalized total-N-acetylaspartate (tNAA: NAA + NAAG [N-acetylaspartyl-glutamate]), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly lower in the frontal cortex of the HDE-exposed rats than that of the LDE-exposed rats. Moreover, compared to the CNTL group, the LDE rats exhibited significantly higher normalized GABA levels. The 6 pairs of normalized metabolite levels were positively (+) or negatively (−) correlated in the rat frontal cortex as follows: tNAA and GABA (+), tNAA and Aspartate (Asp) (−), myo-Inositol (mIns) and Asp (−), mIns and Alanine (+), mIns and Taurine (+), and mIns and tNAA (−). Conclusion: Our results suggested that repeated intermittent ethanol intoxication might result in neuronal degeneration and dysfunction, changes in the rate of GABA synthesis, and oxidative stress in the rat frontal cortex. Our ex vivo 1H high-resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results suggested some novel metabolic markers for the dose-dependent influence of repeated intermittent ethanol intoxication in the frontal cortex.« less
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