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Title: POPULATION CAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH A VERTEBRATE: THE TEMPORAL DEMOGRAPHY AND CYTONUCLEAR GENETICS OF HYBRIDIZATION IN GAMBUSIA FISHES

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Zoology, University of Georgia, Athens Georgia 30602
  2. Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens Georgia 30602
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401324
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Evolution
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 48; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:53:27; Journal ID: ISSN 0014-3820
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Scribner, Kim T., and Avise, John C. POPULATION CAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH A VERTEBRATE: THE TEMPORAL DEMOGRAPHY AND CYTONUCLEAR GENETICS OF HYBRIDIZATION IN GAMBUSIA FISHES. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1994.tb01302.x.
Scribner, Kim T., & Avise, John C. POPULATION CAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH A VERTEBRATE: THE TEMPORAL DEMOGRAPHY AND CYTONUCLEAR GENETICS OF HYBRIDIZATION IN GAMBUSIA FISHES. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1994.tb01302.x.
Scribner, Kim T., and Avise, John C. 2017. "POPULATION CAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH A VERTEBRATE: THE TEMPORAL DEMOGRAPHY AND CYTONUCLEAR GENETICS OF HYBRIDIZATION IN GAMBUSIA FISHES". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1994.tb01302.x.
@article{osti_1401324,
title = {POPULATION CAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH A VERTEBRATE: THE TEMPORAL DEMOGRAPHY AND CYTONUCLEAR GENETICS OF HYBRIDIZATION IN GAMBUSIA FISHES},
author = {Scribner, Kim T. and Avise, John C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/j.1558-5646.1994.tb01302.x},
journal = {Evolution},
number = 1,
volume = 48,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 31, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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