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Title: ANNUAL DIFFERENCES IN FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS AFFECT SPATIAL AND COHORT-SPECIFIC GENOTYPIC HETEROGENEITY IN PAINTED TURTLES

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2]
  1. Department of Zoology, University of Georgia, Athens Georgia 30602
  2. Department of Zoology, University of Georgia, Athens Georgia 30602, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29801
  3. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29801
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401318
Grant/Contract Number:
AC09-76SR00-819
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Evolution
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 47; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:33:24; Journal ID: ISSN 0014-3820
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Scribner, Kim T., Congdon, Justin D., Chesser, Ronald K., and Smith, Michael H.. ANNUAL DIFFERENCES IN FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS AFFECT SPATIAL AND COHORT-SPECIFIC GENOTYPIC HETEROGENEITY IN PAINTED TURTLES. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1993.tb02160.x.
Scribner, Kim T., Congdon, Justin D., Chesser, Ronald K., & Smith, Michael H.. ANNUAL DIFFERENCES IN FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS AFFECT SPATIAL AND COHORT-SPECIFIC GENOTYPIC HETEROGENEITY IN PAINTED TURTLES. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1993.tb02160.x.
Scribner, Kim T., Congdon, Justin D., Chesser, Ronald K., and Smith, Michael H.. 2017. "ANNUAL DIFFERENCES IN FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS AFFECT SPATIAL AND COHORT-SPECIFIC GENOTYPIC HETEROGENEITY IN PAINTED TURTLES". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1993.tb02160.x.
@article{osti_1401318,
title = {ANNUAL DIFFERENCES IN FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS AFFECT SPATIAL AND COHORT-SPECIFIC GENOTYPIC HETEROGENEITY IN PAINTED TURTLES},
author = {Scribner, Kim T. and Congdon, Justin D. and Chesser, Ronald K. and Smith, Michael H.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/j.1558-5646.1993.tb02160.x},
journal = {Evolution},
number = 5,
volume = 47,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 31, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Nesting ecology and reproduction of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) in southeast Michigan were intensively studied from 1975 to 1978. The average clutch size of Michigan painted turtles was 7.55, with body size accounting for only 9-13% of the variance. Data on nesting frequency indicate that from 30 to 50% of the females possibly do not reproduce every year and that approx.6% reproduce twice in a given year. Predation within 48 h of egg-laying is responsible for the failure of 20% of the nests. An additional 12% nest failure is due to various other causes. These data substantially alter the lifemore » table previously reported for this population of painted turtles.« less
  • Nesting ecology and reproduction of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) in southeast Michigan were intensively studied from 1975 to 1978. The average clutch size of Michigan painted turtles was 7.55, with body size accounting for only 9-13% of the variance. Data on nesting frequency indicate that from 30 to 50% of the females possibly do not reproduce every year and that approx. =6% reproduce twice in a given year. Predation within 48 h of egg-laying is responsible for the failure of 20% of the nests. An additional 12% nest failure is due to various other causes. These data substantially alter themore » life table previously reported in this population of painted turtles.« less
  • Breeding seasons and birth cohorts were defined for two populations of mice (Peromyscus polionotus). Cohort-specific differences in reproductive effort were correlated with residual reproductive value. In one population, mice lived nearly 2 y, reproduced at moderate rates, and showed few differences in cohort-specific reproductive strategy. Mice from the other population lived < 1 y, and spring-, summer-, and fall-born females exhibited markedly different reproductive strategies. Cohorts able to breed in a future season had moderate reproductive efforts, which did not increase risk of mortality. Extraordinary efforts (being pregnant and lactating simultaneously), which seriously increased mortality rate, were undertaken when residualmore » reproductive value became zero. Nestling mortality increased with litter size when there were more than three young per litter, but larger litters still resulted in more weaned young than did smaller litters. These observations provide additional confirmation of the model of Pianka and Parker (1975). It is possible that populations of very short-lived mammals characteristically have seasonal cohorts operating under different reproductive strategies.« less
  • Recent advances in computed tomography provide measurement tools to study internal structures of soil aggregates at micrometer resolutions and to improve our understanding of specific mechanisms of various soil processes. Fractal analysis is one of the data analysis tools that can be helpful in evaluating heterogeneity of the intra-aggregate internal structures. The goal of this study was to examine how long-term tillage and land use differences affect intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity. The specific objectives were: (i) to develop an approach to enhance utility of box-counting fractal dimension in characterizing intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity; (ii) to examine intra-aggregate pores in macro-aggregates (4-6 mmmore » in size) using the computed tomography scanning and fractal analysis, and (iii) to compare heterogeneity of intra-aggregate pore space in aggregates from loamy Alfisol soil subjected to 20 yr of contrasting management practices, namely, conventional tillage (chisel plow) (CT), no-till (NT), and native succession vegetation (NS). Three-dimensional images of the intact aggregates were obtained with a resolution of 14.6 {micro}m at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL. Proposed box-counting fractal dimension normalization was successfully implemented to estimate heterogeneity of pore voxel distributions without bias associated with different porosities in soil aggregates. The aggregates from all three studied treatments had higher porosity associated with large (>100 {micro}m) pores present in their centers than in their exteriors. Pores 15 to 60 {micro}m were equally abundant throughout entire aggregates but their distributions were more heterogeneous in aggregate interiors. The CT aggregates had greater numbers of pores 15 to 60 {micro}m than NT and NS. Distribution of pore voxels belonging to large pores was most heterogeneous in the aggregates from NS, followed by NT and by CT. This result was consistent with presence of very large pores associated with former root channels in NT and NS aggregates. Our findings indicate that mechanisms of macro-aggregate formation might differ in their importance in different land use and management practices.« less
  • No abstract prepared.