skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: CAN UNIFORM SELECTION RETARD RANDOM GENETIC DIVERGENCE BETWEEN ISOLATED CONSPECIFIC POPULATIONS?

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts 02138
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401305
Grant/Contract Number:
AS0276EV02472; GM 07620-02; GM08511-01
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Evolution
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:50:21; Journal ID: ISSN 0014-3820
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Cohan, Frederick M. CAN UNIFORM SELECTION RETARD RANDOM GENETIC DIVERGENCE BETWEEN ISOLATED CONSPECIFIC POPULATIONS?. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1984.tb00315.x.
Cohan, Frederick M. CAN UNIFORM SELECTION RETARD RANDOM GENETIC DIVERGENCE BETWEEN ISOLATED CONSPECIFIC POPULATIONS?. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1984.tb00315.x.
Cohan, Frederick M. Tue . "CAN UNIFORM SELECTION RETARD RANDOM GENETIC DIVERGENCE BETWEEN ISOLATED CONSPECIFIC POPULATIONS?". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.1984.tb00315.x.
@article{osti_1401305,
title = {CAN UNIFORM SELECTION RETARD RANDOM GENETIC DIVERGENCE BETWEEN ISOLATED CONSPECIFIC POPULATIONS?},
author = {Cohan, Frederick M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/j.1558-5646.1984.tb00315.x},
journal = {Evolution},
number = 3,
volume = 38,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 30, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 79works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • Genetic divergence in repetitive sequences of nuclear DNA of wild and domestic sheep was studied by general restriction endonuclease mapping (i.e., the taxonoprint method). The PCR RAPD method with one and two arbitrary primers was also used to analyze the nuclear DNA polymorphism in some other regions. The taxonoprint method, performed using six endonucleases, showed specificity and virtually complete similarity in the patterns of repetitive DNA sequences of two wild forms, argali and moufflon, and five domestic sheep breeds. Central Asian breeds, Kazakh fine-fleeced, karakuk, ghissar, and eadeelbay, and an English breed, Lincoln, were examined. The results confirm the opinionmore » that wild and domestic sheep may be considered one polytypic species. The PCR-RAPD method, both with one and two arbitrary primers, revealed a closer similarity of all the sheep breeds examined when aragali, rather than with moufflon, was used. These results indicate that the domestication area of sheep was much more broader than was earlier presumed. Otherwise, hybridizations of domestic and wild forms could occasionally occur in the area of their coexistence. The amplification patterns of PCR-RAPD products are the most promising population genetic markers. 27 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.« less
  • Using Cockerham`s approach of orthogonal scales, we develop genetic models for the effect of an arbitrary number of multiallelic quantitative trait loci (QTLs) or neutral marker loci (NMLs) upon any number of quantitative traits. These models allow the unbiased estimation of the contributions of a set of marker loci to the additive and dominance variances and covariances among traits in a random mating population. The method has been applied to an analysis of allozyme and quantitative data from the European oyster. The contribution of a set of marker loci may either be real, when the markers are actually QTLs, ormore » apparent, when they are NMLs that are in linkage disequilibrium with hidden QTLs. Our results show that the additive and dominance variances contributed by a set of NMLs are always minimum estimates of the corresponding variances contributed by the associated QTLs. In contrast, the apparent contribution of the NMLs to the additive and dominance covariances between two traits may be larger than, equal to or lower than the actual contributions of the QTLs. We also derive an expression for the expected variance explained by the correlation between a quantitative trait and multilocus heterozygosity. This correlation explains only a part of the genetic variance contributed by the markers, i.e., in general, a combination of additive and dominance variances and, thus, provides only very limited information relative to the method supplied here. 94 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.« less