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Title: Cyanobacterial carbon metabolism: Fluxome plasticity and oxygen dependence: Cyanobacterial Carbon Metabolism

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis Missouri 63130
  2. Joint Bio-Energy Institute, Emeryville California, Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California
  3. Joint Bio-Energy Institute, Emeryville California, Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California, California Institute of Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), University of California, Berkeley California, Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley California, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley California. Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Hørsholm Denmark
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401285
Grant/Contract Number:
SCGF2015; DESC0012722
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biotechnology and Bioengineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 7; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:37:58; Journal ID: ISSN 0006-3592
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wan, Ni, DeLorenzo, Drew M., He, Lian, You, Le, Immethun, Cheryl M., Wang, George, Baidoo, Edward E. K., Hollinshead, Whitney, Keasling, Jay D., Moon, Tae Seok, and Tang, Yinjie J. Cyanobacterial carbon metabolism: Fluxome plasticity and oxygen dependence: Cyanobacterial Carbon Metabolism. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/bit.26287.
Wan, Ni, DeLorenzo, Drew M., He, Lian, You, Le, Immethun, Cheryl M., Wang, George, Baidoo, Edward E. K., Hollinshead, Whitney, Keasling, Jay D., Moon, Tae Seok, & Tang, Yinjie J. Cyanobacterial carbon metabolism: Fluxome plasticity and oxygen dependence: Cyanobacterial Carbon Metabolism. United States. doi:10.1002/bit.26287.
Wan, Ni, DeLorenzo, Drew M., He, Lian, You, Le, Immethun, Cheryl M., Wang, George, Baidoo, Edward E. K., Hollinshead, Whitney, Keasling, Jay D., Moon, Tae Seok, and Tang, Yinjie J. Thu . "Cyanobacterial carbon metabolism: Fluxome plasticity and oxygen dependence: Cyanobacterial Carbon Metabolism". United States. doi:10.1002/bit.26287.
@article{osti_1401285,
title = {Cyanobacterial carbon metabolism: Fluxome plasticity and oxygen dependence: Cyanobacterial Carbon Metabolism},
author = {Wan, Ni and DeLorenzo, Drew M. and He, Lian and You, Le and Immethun, Cheryl M. and Wang, George and Baidoo, Edward E. K. and Hollinshead, Whitney and Keasling, Jay D. and Moon, Tae Seok and Tang, Yinjie J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/bit.26287},
journal = {Biotechnology and Bioengineering},
number = 7,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/bit.26287

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 7works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has been widely used as a photo-biorefinery chassis. Based on its genome annotation, this species contains a complete TCA cycle, an Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway (EMPP), an oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), and an Entner–Doudoroff pathway (EDP). To evaluate how Synechocystis 6803 catabolizes glucose under heterotrophic conditions, we performed 13C metabolic flux analysis, metabolite pool size analysis, gene knockouts, and heterologous expressions. The results revealed a cyclic mode of flux through the OPPP. Small, but non-zero, fluxes were observed through the TCA cycle and the malic shunt. Independent knockouts of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (gnd) and malic enzyme (me)more » corroborated these results, as neither mutant could grow under dark heterotrophic conditions. Our data also indicate that Synechocystis 6803 metabolism relies upon oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP from NADPH under dark or insufficient light conditions. The pool sizes of intermediates in the TCA cycle, particularly acetyl-CoA, were found to be several fold lower in Synechocystis 6803 (compared to E. coli metabolite pool sizes), while its sugar phosphate intermediates were several-fold higher. Moreover, negligible flux was detected through the native, or heterologous, EDP in the wild type or Δgnd strains under heterotrophic conditions. Comparing photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions, the Calvin cycle, OPPP, and EMPP in Synechocystis 6803 possess the ability to regulate their fluxes under various growth conditions (plastic), whereas its TCA cycle always maintains at low levels (rigid). This work also demonstrates how genetic profiles do not always reflect actual metabolic flux through native or heterologous pathways. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1593–1602. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.« less
  • This opinion article aims to raise awareness of a fundamental issue which governs sustainable production of biofuels and bio-chemicals from photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Discussed is the plasticity of carbon metabolism, by which the cyanobacterial cells flexibly distribute intracellular carbon fluxes towards target products and adapt to environmental/genetic alterations. This intrinsic feature in cyanobacterial metabolism is being understood through recent identification of new biochemical reactions and engineering on low-throughput pathways. We focus our discussion on new insights into the nature of metabolic plasticity in cyanobacteria and its impact on hydrocarbons (e.g. ethylene and isoprene) production. Here, we discuss approaches that need tomore » be developed to rationally rewire photosynthetic carbon fluxes throughout primary metabolism. We also outline open questions about the regulatory mechanisms of the metabolic network that remain to be answered, which might shed light on photosynthetic carbon metabolism and help optimize design principles in order to improve the production of fuels and chemicals in cyanobacteria.« less
    Cited by 1
  • The effects of added glycine hydroxamate on the photosynthetic incorporation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ into metabolites by isolated mesophyll cells of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) was investigated under conditions favorable to photorespiratory (PR) metabolism (0.04% CO/sub 2/ and 20% O/sub 2/) and under conditions leading to nonphotorespiratory (NPR) metabolism (0.2% CO/sub 2/ and 2.7% O/sub 2/). Glycine hydroxamate (GH) is a competitive inhibitor of the photorespiratory conversion of glycine to serine, CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/. During PR fixation, addition of the inhibitor increased glycine and decreased glutamine labeling. In contrast, labeling of glycine decreased under NPR conditions. Thismore » suggests that when the rate of glycolate synthesis is slow, the primary route of glycine synthesis is through serine rather than from glycolate. GH addition increased serine labeling under PR conditions but not under NPR conditions. This increase in serine labeling under PR conditions but not under NPR conditions. This increase in serine labeling at a time when glycine to serine conversion is partially blocked by the inhibitor may be due to serine accumulation via the ''reverse'' flow of photorespiraton from 3-P-glycerate to hydroxypyruvate when glycine levels are high. GH increased glyoxylate and decreased glycolate labeling. These observations are discussed with respect to possible glyoxylate feedback inhibition of photorespiration.« less