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Title: Land use intensification in the humid tropics increased both alpha and beta diversity of soil bacteria

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [5]
  1. Departamento de Ciência do Solo, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras Minas Gerais 37200-000 Brazil, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Bailrigg Lancaster LA14YQ United Kingdom
  2. Embrapa Agrobiologia, CNPAB, Rodovia BR 465, Km 7 Seropédica Rio de Janeiro CEP 23891-000 Brazil
  3. Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Bailrigg Lancaster LA14YQ United Kingdom, Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, Avenida Magalhães Barata, 376 Belém Pará Brazil
  4. Stockholm Environment Institute, Linnégatan 87D, Box 24218 Stockholm 10451 Sweden
  5. Departamento de Ciência do Solo, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras Minas Gerais 37200-000 Brazil
  6. Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401219
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-99ER62848; FC02-07ER64494
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 97; Journal Issue: 10; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:53:24; Journal ID: ISSN 0012-9658
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

de Carvalho, Teotonio Soares, Jesus, Ederson da Conceição, Barlow, Jos, Gardner, Toby A., Soares, Isaac Carvalho, Tiedje, James M., and Moreira, Fatima Maria de Souza. Land use intensification in the humid tropics increased both alpha and beta diversity of soil bacteria. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/ecy.1513.
de Carvalho, Teotonio Soares, Jesus, Ederson da Conceição, Barlow, Jos, Gardner, Toby A., Soares, Isaac Carvalho, Tiedje, James M., & Moreira, Fatima Maria de Souza. Land use intensification in the humid tropics increased both alpha and beta diversity of soil bacteria. United States. doi:10.1002/ecy.1513.
de Carvalho, Teotonio Soares, Jesus, Ederson da Conceição, Barlow, Jos, Gardner, Toby A., Soares, Isaac Carvalho, Tiedje, James M., and Moreira, Fatima Maria de Souza. 2016. "Land use intensification in the humid tropics increased both alpha and beta diversity of soil bacteria". United States. doi:10.1002/ecy.1513.
@article{osti_1401219,
title = {Land use intensification in the humid tropics increased both alpha and beta diversity of soil bacteria},
author = {de Carvalho, Teotonio Soares and Jesus, Ederson da Conceição and Barlow, Jos and Gardner, Toby A. and Soares, Isaac Carvalho and Tiedje, James M. and Moreira, Fatima Maria de Souza},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/ecy.1513},
journal = {Ecology},
number = 10,
volume = 97,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/ecy.1513

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