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Title: Capture and coding of industry and occupation measures: Findings from eight National Program of Cancer Registries states

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];
  1. Cancer Surveillance Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta Georgia
  2. New Hampshire State Cancer Registry and the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Department of Epidemiology, Hanover, New Hampshire
  3. Cancer Data Registry of Idaho, Boise, Idaho
  4. Colorado Central Cancer Registry, Denver, Colorado
  5. Rhode Island Cancer Registry, Providence, Rhode Island
  6. Louisiana Tumor Registry and Epidemiology Program, School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401067
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 60; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:11:16; Journal ID: ISSN 0271-3586
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Freeman, MaryBeth B., Pollack, Lori A., Rees, Judy R., Johnson, Christopher J., Rycroft, Randi K., Rousseau, David L., Hsieh, Mei-Chin, and On behalf of the enhancement of NPCR for comparative effectiveness research team. Capture and coding of industry and occupation measures: Findings from eight National Program of Cancer Registries states. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/ajim.22739.
Freeman, MaryBeth B., Pollack, Lori A., Rees, Judy R., Johnson, Christopher J., Rycroft, Randi K., Rousseau, David L., Hsieh, Mei-Chin, & On behalf of the enhancement of NPCR for comparative effectiveness research team. Capture and coding of industry and occupation measures: Findings from eight National Program of Cancer Registries states. United States. doi:10.1002/ajim.22739.
Freeman, MaryBeth B., Pollack, Lori A., Rees, Judy R., Johnson, Christopher J., Rycroft, Randi K., Rousseau, David L., Hsieh, Mei-Chin, and On behalf of the enhancement of NPCR for comparative effectiveness research team. Mon . "Capture and coding of industry and occupation measures: Findings from eight National Program of Cancer Registries states". United States. doi:10.1002/ajim.22739.
@article{osti_1401067,
title = {Capture and coding of industry and occupation measures: Findings from eight National Program of Cancer Registries states},
author = {Freeman, MaryBeth B. and Pollack, Lori A. and Rees, Judy R. and Johnson, Christopher J. and Rycroft, Randi K. and Rousseau, David L. and Hsieh, Mei-Chin and On behalf of the enhancement of NPCR for comparative effectiveness research team},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/ajim.22739},
journal = {American Journal of Industrial Medicine},
number = 8,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 10, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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