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Title: Genomic data detect corresponding signatures of population size change on an ecological time scale in two salamander species

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Department of Biology, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY 40506 USA
  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, P O Drawer E Aiken SC 29802 USA
  3. Department of Biology, Florida State University, Tallahassee FL 32306 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1401039
Grant/Contract Number:
FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Molecular Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:14:31; Journal ID: ISSN 0962-1083
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Nunziata, Schyler O., Lance, Stacey L., Scott, David E., Lemmon, Emily Moriarty, and Weisrock, David W.. Genomic data detect corresponding signatures of population size change on an ecological time scale in two salamander species. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/mec.13988.
Nunziata, Schyler O., Lance, Stacey L., Scott, David E., Lemmon, Emily Moriarty, & Weisrock, David W.. Genomic data detect corresponding signatures of population size change on an ecological time scale in two salamander species. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/mec.13988.
Nunziata, Schyler O., Lance, Stacey L., Scott, David E., Lemmon, Emily Moriarty, and Weisrock, David W.. Sat . "Genomic data detect corresponding signatures of population size change on an ecological time scale in two salamander species". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/mec.13988.
@article{osti_1401039,
title = {Genomic data detect corresponding signatures of population size change on an ecological time scale in two salamander species},
author = {Nunziata, Schyler O. and Lance, Stacey L. and Scott, David E. and Lemmon, Emily Moriarty and Weisrock, David W.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/mec.13988},
journal = {Molecular Ecology},
number = 4,
volume = 26,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sat Jan 21 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sat Jan 21 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/mec.13988

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • No abstract prepared.