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Title: Habitat continuity and stepping-stone oceanographic distances explain population genetic connectivity of the brown alga Cystoseira amentacea

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2]
  1. CCMAR-CIMAR Laboratorio Associado, F.C.T.- Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas 8005-139 Faro Portugal, Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche ed Ambientali, UO Conisma, University of Bologna, Via S. Alberto 163 48123 Ravenna Italy
  2. CCMAR-CIMAR Laboratorio Associado, F.C.T.- Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas 8005-139 Faro Portugal
  3. Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche ed Ambientali, UO Conisma, University of Bologna, Via S. Alberto 163 48123 Ravenna Italy
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1400850
Grant/Contract Number:
SFRH/BPD/63703/2009; SFRH/BPD/107878/2015
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Molecular Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 15:51:43; Journal ID: ISSN 0962-1083
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Buonomo, Roberto, Assis, Jorge, Fernandes, Francisco, Engelen, Aschwin H., Airoldi, Laura, and Serrão, Ester A.. Habitat continuity and stepping-stone oceanographic distances explain population genetic connectivity of the brown alga Cystoseira amentacea. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/mec.13960.
Buonomo, Roberto, Assis, Jorge, Fernandes, Francisco, Engelen, Aschwin H., Airoldi, Laura, & Serrão, Ester A.. Habitat continuity and stepping-stone oceanographic distances explain population genetic connectivity of the brown alga Cystoseira amentacea. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/mec.13960.
Buonomo, Roberto, Assis, Jorge, Fernandes, Francisco, Engelen, Aschwin H., Airoldi, Laura, and Serrão, Ester A.. Tue . "Habitat continuity and stepping-stone oceanographic distances explain population genetic connectivity of the brown alga Cystoseira amentacea". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/mec.13960.
@article{osti_1400850,
title = {Habitat continuity and stepping-stone oceanographic distances explain population genetic connectivity of the brown alga Cystoseira amentacea},
author = {Buonomo, Roberto and Assis, Jorge and Fernandes, Francisco and Engelen, Aschwin H. and Airoldi, Laura and Serrão, Ester A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/mec.13960},
journal = {Molecular Ecology},
number = 3,
volume = 26,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Tue Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/mec.13960

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4works
Citation information provided by
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