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Title: Atmospheric CH 4 oxidation by Arctic permafrost and mineral cryosols as a function of water saturation and temperature

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton NJ USA
  2. The Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN USA
  3. Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Montreal QC Canada
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1400809
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0004902
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geobiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 15:39:06; Journal ID: ISSN 1472-4677
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Stackhouse, B., Lau, M. C. Y., Vishnivetskaya, T., Burton, N., Wang, R., Southworth, A., Whyte, L., and Onstott, T. C. Atmospheric CH 4 oxidation by Arctic permafrost and mineral cryosols as a function of water saturation and temperature. United Kingdom: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1111/gbi.12193.
Stackhouse, B., Lau, M. C. Y., Vishnivetskaya, T., Burton, N., Wang, R., Southworth, A., Whyte, L., & Onstott, T. C. Atmospheric CH 4 oxidation by Arctic permafrost and mineral cryosols as a function of water saturation and temperature. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/gbi.12193.
Stackhouse, B., Lau, M. C. Y., Vishnivetskaya, T., Burton, N., Wang, R., Southworth, A., Whyte, L., and Onstott, T. C. 2016. "Atmospheric CH 4 oxidation by Arctic permafrost and mineral cryosols as a function of water saturation and temperature". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/gbi.12193.
@article{osti_1400809,
title = {Atmospheric CH 4 oxidation by Arctic permafrost and mineral cryosols as a function of water saturation and temperature},
author = {Stackhouse, B. and Lau, M. C. Y. and Vishnivetskaya, T. and Burton, N. and Wang, R. and Southworth, A. and Whyte, L. and Onstott, T. C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/gbi.12193},
journal = {Geobiology},
number = 1,
volume = 15,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/gbi.12193

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  • The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH₄)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH₄ emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH₄-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH⁺ uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH₄ sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 °C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineralmore » cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH₄ feedback.« less
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