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Title: Micro X-Ray computed tomography imaging and ultrasonic velocity measurements in tetrahydrofuran-hydrate-bearing sediments: THF-hydrate bearing sediments

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 80401 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1400791
Grant/Contract Number:
DEFE0009963
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geophysical Prospecting
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 65; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 15:50:48; Journal ID: ISSN 0016-8025
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Schindler, Mandy, Batzle, Michael L., and Prasad, Manika. Micro X-Ray computed tomography imaging and ultrasonic velocity measurements in tetrahydrofuran-hydrate-bearing sediments: THF-hydrate bearing sediments. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1111/1365-2478.12449.
Schindler, Mandy, Batzle, Michael L., & Prasad, Manika. Micro X-Ray computed tomography imaging and ultrasonic velocity measurements in tetrahydrofuran-hydrate-bearing sediments: THF-hydrate bearing sediments. United States. doi:10.1111/1365-2478.12449.
Schindler, Mandy, Batzle, Michael L., and Prasad, Manika. Wed . "Micro X-Ray computed tomography imaging and ultrasonic velocity measurements in tetrahydrofuran-hydrate-bearing sediments: THF-hydrate bearing sediments". United States. doi:10.1111/1365-2478.12449.
@article{osti_1400791,
title = {Micro X-Ray computed tomography imaging and ultrasonic velocity measurements in tetrahydrofuran-hydrate-bearing sediments: THF-hydrate bearing sediments},
author = {Schindler, Mandy and Batzle, Michael L. and Prasad, Manika},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/1365-2478.12449},
journal = {Geophysical Prospecting},
number = 4,
volume = 65,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 21 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Sep 21 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/1365-2478.12449

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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