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Title: Mechanism of Lithium Metal Penetration through Inorganic Solid Electrolytes

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [4];  [6];  [7];  [4];  [4]
  1. Department of Material Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA, Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt 64287 Germany
  2. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA
  3. School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence RI 02912 USA
  4. Department of Material Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 USA
  5. Institute of Material Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt Germany
  6. Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin Germany
  7. Leibniz Institute for Crystal Growth (IKZ), 12489 Berlin Germany
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1400633
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0002633; FG02-10ER46771
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Energy Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 20; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-25 11:01:28; Journal ID: ISSN 1614-6832
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Porz, Lukas, Swamy, Tushar, Sheldon, Brian W., Rettenwander, Daniel, Frömling, Till, Thaman, Henry L., Berendts, Stefan, Uecker, Reinhard, Carter, W. Craig, and Chiang, Yet-Ming. Mechanism of Lithium Metal Penetration through Inorganic Solid Electrolytes. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/aenm.201701003.
Porz, Lukas, Swamy, Tushar, Sheldon, Brian W., Rettenwander, Daniel, Frömling, Till, Thaman, Henry L., Berendts, Stefan, Uecker, Reinhard, Carter, W. Craig, & Chiang, Yet-Ming. Mechanism of Lithium Metal Penetration through Inorganic Solid Electrolytes. Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201701003.
Porz, Lukas, Swamy, Tushar, Sheldon, Brian W., Rettenwander, Daniel, Frömling, Till, Thaman, Henry L., Berendts, Stefan, Uecker, Reinhard, Carter, W. Craig, and Chiang, Yet-Ming. Thu . "Mechanism of Lithium Metal Penetration through Inorganic Solid Electrolytes". Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201701003.
@article{osti_1400633,
title = {Mechanism of Lithium Metal Penetration through Inorganic Solid Electrolytes},
author = {Porz, Lukas and Swamy, Tushar and Sheldon, Brian W. and Rettenwander, Daniel and Frömling, Till and Thaman, Henry L. and Berendts, Stefan and Uecker, Reinhard and Carter, W. Craig and Chiang, Yet-Ming},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/aenm.201701003},
journal = {Advanced Energy Materials},
number = 20,
volume = 7,
place = {Germany},
year = {Thu Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 6, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 7works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • In recent years, the Li metal anode has regained a position of paramount research interest because of the necessity for employing Li metal in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O-2. Severely limiting this utilization, however, are the rapid capacity degradation and safety issues associated with rechargeable Li metal anodes. A fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of Li metal at high charge rates has remained elusive due to the complicated interfacial chemistry that occurs between Li metal and liquid electrolytes. Here, it is demonstrated that at high current density the quick formation of a highly resistive solid electrolytemore » interphase (SEI) entangled with Li metal, which grows towards the bulk Li, dramatically increases up the cell impedance and this is the actual origin of the onset of cell degradation and failure. This is instead of dendritic or mossy Li growing outwards from the metal surface towards/through the separator and/or the consumption of the Li and electrolyte through side reactions. Interphase, in this context, refers to a substantive layer rather than a thin interfacial layer. Discerning the mechanisms and consequences for this interphase formation is crucial for resolving the stability and safety issues associated with Li metal anodes.« less
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