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Title: Feedbacks between plant N demand and rhizosphere priming depend on type of mycorrhizal association

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];
  1. Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey USA
  2. Department of Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown WV USA
  3. Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University, Princeton NJ USA
  4. NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton NJ USA
  5. Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, New York NY USA
  6. Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington IN USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1400631
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0016188
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ecology Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 15:22:09; Journal ID: ISSN 1461-023X
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sulman, Benjamin N., Brzostek, Edward R., Medici, Chiara, Shevliakova, Elena, Menge, Duncan N. L., Phillips, Richard P., and Cleland, ed., Elsa. Feedbacks between plant N demand and rhizosphere priming depend on type of mycorrhizal association. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/ele.12802.
Sulman, Benjamin N., Brzostek, Edward R., Medici, Chiara, Shevliakova, Elena, Menge, Duncan N. L., Phillips, Richard P., & Cleland, ed., Elsa. Feedbacks between plant N demand and rhizosphere priming depend on type of mycorrhizal association. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/ele.12802.
Sulman, Benjamin N., Brzostek, Edward R., Medici, Chiara, Shevliakova, Elena, Menge, Duncan N. L., Phillips, Richard P., and Cleland, ed., Elsa. Sun . "Feedbacks between plant N demand and rhizosphere priming depend on type of mycorrhizal association". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/ele.12802.
@article{osti_1400631,
title = {Feedbacks between plant N demand and rhizosphere priming depend on type of mycorrhizal association},
author = {Sulman, Benjamin N. and Brzostek, Edward R. and Medici, Chiara and Shevliakova, Elena and Menge, Duncan N. L. and Phillips, Richard P. and Cleland, ed., Elsa},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/ele.12802},
journal = {Ecology Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 20,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sun Jul 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Jul 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 2, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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