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Title: SurR is a master regulator of the primary electron flow pathways in the order Thermococcales: SurR controls electron flow pathways in thermococcales

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens GA USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1400621
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-08ER64690; FG05-95ER20175
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Molecular microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 15:22:39; Journal ID: ISSN 0950-382X
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
FAO
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lipscomb, Gina L., Schut, Gerrit J., Scott, Robert A., and Adams, Michael W. W. SurR is a master regulator of the primary electron flow pathways in the order Thermococcales: SurR controls electron flow pathways in thermococcales. FAO: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/mmi.13668.
Lipscomb, Gina L., Schut, Gerrit J., Scott, Robert A., & Adams, Michael W. W. SurR is a master regulator of the primary electron flow pathways in the order Thermococcales: SurR controls electron flow pathways in thermococcales. FAO. doi:10.1111/mmi.13668.
Lipscomb, Gina L., Schut, Gerrit J., Scott, Robert A., and Adams, Michael W. W. Tue . "SurR is a master regulator of the primary electron flow pathways in the order Thermococcales: SurR controls electron flow pathways in thermococcales". FAO. doi:10.1111/mmi.13668.
@article{osti_1400621,
title = {SurR is a master regulator of the primary electron flow pathways in the order Thermococcales: SurR controls electron flow pathways in thermococcales},
author = {Lipscomb, Gina L. and Schut, Gerrit J. and Scott, Robert A. and Adams, Michael W. W.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/mmi.13668},
journal = {Molecular microbiology},
number = 5,
volume = 104,
place = {FAO},
year = {Tue Apr 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Apr 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/mmi.13668

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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