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Title: Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites: A comparison of graphite and carbon nanofiber fillers: Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. The Molecular Foundry, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California 94720 USA
  2. Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California 94720 USA
  3. Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California 94720 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1400582
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physica Status Solidi. A, Applications and Materials Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 214; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 15:02:32; Journal ID: ISSN 1862-6300
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ruminski, Anne M., Yang, Fan, Cho, Eun Seon, Silber, Joseph, Olivera, Edgar, Johnson, Thomas, Anderssen, Eric C., Haber, Carl H., and Urban, Jeffrey J. Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites: A comparison of graphite and carbon nanofiber fillers: Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites. Germany: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/pssa.201600368.
Ruminski, Anne M., Yang, Fan, Cho, Eun Seon, Silber, Joseph, Olivera, Edgar, Johnson, Thomas, Anderssen, Eric C., Haber, Carl H., & Urban, Jeffrey J. Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites: A comparison of graphite and carbon nanofiber fillers: Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites. Germany. doi:10.1002/pssa.201600368.
Ruminski, Anne M., Yang, Fan, Cho, Eun Seon, Silber, Joseph, Olivera, Edgar, Johnson, Thomas, Anderssen, Eric C., Haber, Carl H., and Urban, Jeffrey J. 2016. "Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites: A comparison of graphite and carbon nanofiber fillers: Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites". Germany. doi:10.1002/pssa.201600368.
@article{osti_1400582,
title = {Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites: A comparison of graphite and carbon nanofiber fillers: Geometric analysis of enhanced thermal conductivity in epoxy composites},
author = {Ruminski, Anne M. and Yang, Fan and Cho, Eun Seon and Silber, Joseph and Olivera, Edgar and Johnson, Thomas and Anderssen, Eric C. and Haber, Carl H. and Urban, Jeffrey J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/pssa.201600368},
journal = {Physica Status Solidi. A, Applications and Materials Science},
number = 1,
volume = 214,
place = {Germany},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/pssa.201600368

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