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Title: Crystal River 3 Cable Materials for Thermal and Gamma Radiation Aging

Abstract

The Expanded Materials Degradation Assessment Volume 5: Aging of Cables and Cable Systems (EMDA) summarizes the state of knowledge of materials, constructions, operating environments, and aging behavior of low voltage and medium cables in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and identifies potential knowledge gaps with regard to cable operation beyond 60 years. The greatest area of uncertainty relates to how well the accelerated aging used in the original equipment qualification (EQ) processes predicts the performance of cable materials in extended operation. General opinion and utility experience have indicated that actual operating environments of in-plant cables are not as severe, however, as the operating and design basis environments used in the qualification process. Better understanding of the long term aging behavior of cable insulation materials in service conditions and the analysis of actual cable operating environments are the objectives of ongoing research to support subsequent license renewal activities in particular and long term cable aging management in general. A key component of the effort to better understand cable material aging behavior is the availability of representative samples of cables that have been installed in operating light water reactors and have experienced long term service. Unique access to long term service cables, includingmore » relatively rich information on cable identity and history, occurred in 2016 through the assistance of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). EPRI facilitated DOE receipt of harvested cables from the decommissioned Crystal River Unit 3 (CR3) pressurized water reactor representing six of the nine most common low voltage cable manufacturers (EPRI 103841R1): Rockbestos, Anaconda Wire and Cable Company (Anaconda), Boston Insulated Wire (BIW), Brand-Rex, Kerite and Okonite. Cable samples received had been installed in the operating plant for durations ranging from 10 years to 36 years. These cables provide the opportunity to assess actual in-plant material aging and compare it to the expectations for service aging implied in original equipment qualification. The received samples are from cables manufactured as early as 1971 and as late as 1998. Of the original manufacturers, BIW, Anaconda and Kerite no longer supply low-voltage cables to the nuclear industry. Okonite, Rockbestos, and Brand-Rex do still supply nuclear-grade low-voltage cables, but most cable insulation formulations have changed over the years. Thus the availability of the CR3 samples representative of cables installed in existing U.S. NPPs also presents the opportunity for additional aging studies on the most relevant insulation and jacketing materials. This report describes the cables received from CR3 through EPRI assistance, some of the specific knowledge gaps that study of these cable materials can be used to address, and experimental plans for addressing those gaps using these materials. Harvested cables from CR3 and other NPPs that have experienced long term service, new old stock cables (manufactured before 2000, but never put in service), and relevant modern nuclear cables and materials from cable manufacturers are enabling research to address identified knowledge gaps and better understand long term aging behavior for cable materials currently installed in NPPs. This research, combined with refined understanding of actual service environments and conditions, will both support subsequent licensing activities and more efficient plant cable aging management.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1400349
Report Number(s):
PNNL-26785
830403000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; Cable aging; insulation; epr; xple; harvested; nuclear; activation energy; simultaneous aging

Citation Formats

Fifield, Leonard S., Correa, Miguel, and Zwoster, Andy. Crystal River 3 Cable Materials for Thermal and Gamma Radiation Aging. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1400349.
Fifield, Leonard S., Correa, Miguel, & Zwoster, Andy. Crystal River 3 Cable Materials for Thermal and Gamma Radiation Aging. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1400349
Fifield, Leonard S., Correa, Miguel, and Zwoster, Andy. 2017. "Crystal River 3 Cable Materials for Thermal and Gamma Radiation Aging". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1400349. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1400349.
@article{osti_1400349,
title = {Crystal River 3 Cable Materials for Thermal and Gamma Radiation Aging},
author = {Fifield, Leonard S. and Correa, Miguel and Zwoster, Andy},
abstractNote = {The Expanded Materials Degradation Assessment Volume 5: Aging of Cables and Cable Systems (EMDA) summarizes the state of knowledge of materials, constructions, operating environments, and aging behavior of low voltage and medium cables in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and identifies potential knowledge gaps with regard to cable operation beyond 60 years. The greatest area of uncertainty relates to how well the accelerated aging used in the original equipment qualification (EQ) processes predicts the performance of cable materials in extended operation. General opinion and utility experience have indicated that actual operating environments of in-plant cables are not as severe, however, as the operating and design basis environments used in the qualification process. Better understanding of the long term aging behavior of cable insulation materials in service conditions and the analysis of actual cable operating environments are the objectives of ongoing research to support subsequent license renewal activities in particular and long term cable aging management in general. A key component of the effort to better understand cable material aging behavior is the availability of representative samples of cables that have been installed in operating light water reactors and have experienced long term service. Unique access to long term service cables, including relatively rich information on cable identity and history, occurred in 2016 through the assistance of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). EPRI facilitated DOE receipt of harvested cables from the decommissioned Crystal River Unit 3 (CR3) pressurized water reactor representing six of the nine most common low voltage cable manufacturers (EPRI 103841R1): Rockbestos, Anaconda Wire and Cable Company (Anaconda), Boston Insulated Wire (BIW), Brand-Rex, Kerite and Okonite. Cable samples received had been installed in the operating plant for durations ranging from 10 years to 36 years. These cables provide the opportunity to assess actual in-plant material aging and compare it to the expectations for service aging implied in original equipment qualification. The received samples are from cables manufactured as early as 1971 and as late as 1998. Of the original manufacturers, BIW, Anaconda and Kerite no longer supply low-voltage cables to the nuclear industry. Okonite, Rockbestos, and Brand-Rex do still supply nuclear-grade low-voltage cables, but most cable insulation formulations have changed over the years. Thus the availability of the CR3 samples representative of cables installed in existing U.S. NPPs also presents the opportunity for additional aging studies on the most relevant insulation and jacketing materials. This report describes the cables received from CR3 through EPRI assistance, some of the specific knowledge gaps that study of these cable materials can be used to address, and experimental plans for addressing those gaps using these materials. Harvested cables from CR3 and other NPPs that have experienced long term service, new old stock cables (manufactured before 2000, but never put in service), and relevant modern nuclear cables and materials from cable manufacturers are enabling research to address identified knowledge gaps and better understand long term aging behavior for cable materials currently installed in NPPs. This research, combined with refined understanding of actual service environments and conditions, will both support subsequent licensing activities and more efficient plant cable aging management.},
doi = {10.2172/1400349},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1400349}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}