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Title: Impacts of Commercial Building Controls on Energy Savings and Peak Load Reduction

Abstract

Commercial buildings in the United States use about 18 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of primary energy annually . Studies have shown that as much as 30% of building energy consumption can be avoided by using more accurate sensing, using existing controls better, and deploying advanced controls; hence, the motivation for the work described in this report. Studies also have shown that 10% to 20% of the commercial building peak load can be temporarily managed/curtailed to provide grid services. Although many studies have indicated significant potential for reducing the energy consumption in commercial buildings, very few have documented the actual savings. The studies that did so only provided savings at the whole building level, which makes it difficult to assess the savings potential of each individual measure deployed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1400347
Report Number(s):
PNNL-25985
BT0310000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION

Citation Formats

Fernandez, Nicholas E.P., Katipamula, Srinivas, Wang, Weimin, Xie, YuLong, Zhao, Mingjie, and Corbin, Charles D. Impacts of Commercial Building Controls on Energy Savings and Peak Load Reduction. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1400347.
Fernandez, Nicholas E.P., Katipamula, Srinivas, Wang, Weimin, Xie, YuLong, Zhao, Mingjie, & Corbin, Charles D. Impacts of Commercial Building Controls on Energy Savings and Peak Load Reduction. United States. doi:10.2172/1400347.
Fernandez, Nicholas E.P., Katipamula, Srinivas, Wang, Weimin, Xie, YuLong, Zhao, Mingjie, and Corbin, Charles D. Tue . "Impacts of Commercial Building Controls on Energy Savings and Peak Load Reduction". United States. doi:10.2172/1400347. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1400347.
@article{osti_1400347,
title = {Impacts of Commercial Building Controls on Energy Savings and Peak Load Reduction},
author = {Fernandez, Nicholas E.P. and Katipamula, Srinivas and Wang, Weimin and Xie, YuLong and Zhao, Mingjie and Corbin, Charles D.},
abstractNote = {Commercial buildings in the United States use about 18 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of primary energy annually . Studies have shown that as much as 30% of building energy consumption can be avoided by using more accurate sensing, using existing controls better, and deploying advanced controls; hence, the motivation for the work described in this report. Studies also have shown that 10% to 20% of the commercial building peak load can be temporarily managed/curtailed to provide grid services. Although many studies have indicated significant potential for reducing the energy consumption in commercial buildings, very few have documented the actual savings. The studies that did so only provided savings at the whole building level, which makes it difficult to assess the savings potential of each individual measure deployed.},
doi = {10.2172/1400347},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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