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Title: Tidal marsh restoration stimulates the growth of winter shorebird populations in a temperate estuary: Restoration of winter shorebird populations

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Cypress Grove Research Center, Audubon Canyon Ranch (ACR), PO Box 808 Marshall CA 94940 U.S.A.
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Acquisition and Project Management (EM-50)
OSTI Identifier:
1400344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Restoration Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-19 19:20:56; Journal ID: ISSN 1061-2971
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kelly, John P., and Condeso, T. Emiko. Tidal marsh restoration stimulates the growth of winter shorebird populations in a temperate estuary: Restoration of winter shorebird populations. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/rec.12487.
Kelly, John P., & Condeso, T. Emiko. Tidal marsh restoration stimulates the growth of winter shorebird populations in a temperate estuary: Restoration of winter shorebird populations. United States. doi:10.1111/rec.12487.
Kelly, John P., and Condeso, T. Emiko. Wed . "Tidal marsh restoration stimulates the growth of winter shorebird populations in a temperate estuary: Restoration of winter shorebird populations". United States. doi:10.1111/rec.12487.
@article{osti_1400344,
title = {Tidal marsh restoration stimulates the growth of winter shorebird populations in a temperate estuary: Restoration of winter shorebird populations},
author = {Kelly, John P. and Condeso, T. Emiko},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/rec.12487},
journal = {Restoration Ecology},
number = 4,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/rec.12487

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • One important consequence of building a barrage across the Severn Estuary to generate electricity from tidal power would be a reduction in the tidal range upstream of such a barrage, which would in turn reduce the size of the intertidal feeding areas available to the nine species of shorebirds that occur there in internationally important numbers. However, it may be possible to select new low tide levels which would minimize the effects on birds without sacrificing too much power output. In any further studies, more attention needs to be paid to the possibility of such compromises between the interests ofmore » optimal power generation and environmental conservation.« less
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  • No abstract prepared.
  • A three-year study of Connecticut, USA, salt-marsh vegetation was undertaken to determine the relationship of its distribution on the marsh surface to tidal levels, particularly mean high water (MHW) as measured on each of three sites representing different tidal amplitudes. Elevations and species present were measured on 1-m/sup 2/ grids in 10 x 70-m belt transects at each site. After the data were subjected to discriminant analysis and other standard statistical procedures, the results showed that 98.4% of all observations of Spartina alterniflora Loisel. occurred at or below MHW. The data can aid in salt-marsh restoration by offering a reliablemore » indicator of what species should be planted when restored elevations and on-site MHW are known.« less