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Title: Effect of annealing on nanoindentation slips in a bulk metallic glass

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1400332
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0011194
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review B
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 13; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-19 10:16:09; Journal ID: ISSN 2469-9950
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Coleman, J. Patrick, Meng, Fanqiang, Tsuchiya, Koichi, Beadsworth, James, LeBlanc, Michael, Liaw, Peter K., Uhl, Jonathan T., Weaver, Richard L., and Dahmen, Karin A. Effect of annealing on nanoindentation slips in a bulk metallic glass. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.96.134117.
Coleman, J. Patrick, Meng, Fanqiang, Tsuchiya, Koichi, Beadsworth, James, LeBlanc, Michael, Liaw, Peter K., Uhl, Jonathan T., Weaver, Richard L., & Dahmen, Karin A. Effect of annealing on nanoindentation slips in a bulk metallic glass. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.96.134117.
Coleman, J. Patrick, Meng, Fanqiang, Tsuchiya, Koichi, Beadsworth, James, LeBlanc, Michael, Liaw, Peter K., Uhl, Jonathan T., Weaver, Richard L., and Dahmen, Karin A. 2017. "Effect of annealing on nanoindentation slips in a bulk metallic glass". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.96.134117.
@article{osti_1400332,
title = {Effect of annealing on nanoindentation slips in a bulk metallic glass},
author = {Coleman, J. Patrick and Meng, Fanqiang and Tsuchiya, Koichi and Beadsworth, James and LeBlanc, Michael and Liaw, Peter K. and Uhl, Jonathan T. and Weaver, Richard L. and Dahmen, Karin A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.96.134117},
journal = {Physical Review B},
number = 13,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on October 19, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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