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Title: The DC Response Of Electrically Conducting Fractures Excited By A Grounded Current Source.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
CARBO CRADA
OSTI Identifier:
1400028
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-10203C
648203
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the International Petroleum Technology Conference held November 14-16, 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

BLANK AUTHORITY TEXT, Knox, Hunter Anne, Schramm, Kimberly A, and Bartel, Lewis C. The DC Response Of Electrically Conducting Fractures Excited By A Grounded Current Source.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
BLANK AUTHORITY TEXT, Knox, Hunter Anne, Schramm, Kimberly A, & Bartel, Lewis C. The DC Response Of Electrically Conducting Fractures Excited By A Grounded Current Source.. United States.
BLANK AUTHORITY TEXT, Knox, Hunter Anne, Schramm, Kimberly A, and Bartel, Lewis C. 2016. "The DC Response Of Electrically Conducting Fractures Excited By A Grounded Current Source.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1400028.
@article{osti_1400028,
title = {The DC Response Of Electrically Conducting Fractures Excited By A Grounded Current Source.},
author = {BLANK AUTHORITY TEXT and Knox, Hunter Anne and Schramm, Kimberly A and Bartel, Lewis C},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Conference:
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